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Think social is going to fundamentally change how business gets done?

 

http://files1.jivesoftware.com/images/infographics/sbi-exec-make-jump-to-social-21986.jpg

 

I suppose if you're a regular reader of our blog, your answer is probably yes.

 

However, we felt the industry needed a broader index that highlighted the perceptions of social business strategies employed by companies across various industries.

 

So that's what we're announcing today. We just finished performing a market analysis survey with Penn Schoen Berland, which provides powerful evidence that if dismissing social as a fad is risky business.

 

In fact, to the question above, of the 902 survey respondents from  mid -and large-sized companies, 73% of execs and 73% of millennials agree that social is going to fundamentally change how business gets done.

 

I'll be digging into some of the other survey results in upcoming blog posts, but today, I'm introducing the Social Business Index itself as well as taking a look at executive readiness for social.

 

The infographic (also attached below for download) highlights how social is not only moving to the enterprise swiftly, but also being pushed from both the top down (executives) and the bottom up (millennials).

 

 

Two observations from this aspect of the data include:

 

1.  Execs are leading the charge.

 

They're bringing social into the workplace. They understand the significant impact it's going to have on business.  For instance, 82% of execs  said they leverage at least 1 social network for work use (vs. 58%  for millennials).

 

2.  Most companies still have a lot of work to do in creating comprehensive social business strategies.

 

This survey shows that both technology and strategic guidance are critical when implementing social.  Many have been experimenting with social from a technology standpoint, which ultimately hasn't enabled them get ahead.

 

 

 

Coincidentally, these results mirror what we heard just last week at  the Enterprise 2.0  Conference in Boston. Here's a short clip  highlighting how understanding of the impact of social has significantly  increased in the  last few years as well as an example of a company  that is definitely ahead of the curve (and using Jive internally,  externally, and for social media monitoring).

 

 

 

And here's some additional information on the Social Business Index Survey.  The results are both eye-opening and validating that social will undoubtedly be the single largest shift in business in a generation.

 

 

Does this survey data surprise you? Leave a comment below, where you'll also find a copy of the infographic to download.


Death of Email.

Posted by tim.zonca Jun 28, 2011
Death of Email.
The death of email has been a topic for nearly a decade now. Whether a push for “No Email Fridays” (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/fridays-at-veritas-casual-days-without-email) years ago, or a more recent move to an email free workplace (http://currents.michaelsampson.net/2011/02/being-email-free-atos-origin-sets-a-goal.html), the topic keeps coming up.
Though I appreciate the noble pursuit of killing email, pondering the viability of email is a distraction. Sure, most of us would love to see email usage dwindle to the likes of the fax machine and desktop printer, but don’t expect to read email’s obituary anytime soon. In fact, most signs point to email being healthy for quite a while.
Rather than focus on the death of email, let’s look at why we want email to die. Most of us spend nearly 3 months a year in our inboxes, and because of this familiarity with email, we are all painfully aware that there must be a better way to collaborate.
As a Jiver I’m biased – I think everyone should use Jive to collaborate. But as sexy and intuitive as Jive is, and even in the most progressive and tech savvy organizations, 100% adoption isn’t a given without being prescriptive and deliberate. When you set out to make social collaboration better, you need to consider a broad set of different employees that span the tech adoption curve. Here’s where email (with a little help) becomes a friend to collaboration, rather than a foe to demolish.
Take Outlook for example. With about 600 million Office users around the world, what if you could bring all the power of cutting edge social collaboration technologies to people though an application they live in all day long, like email? What if you could connect employees without them having to learn a whole new system or application? What if employees could stay in their comfortable email system, but instead of keeping conversations locked away in their inboxes, they were able to share information and expertise without changing their habits?
With Jive you can. We’re giving email a social life (http://www.jivesoftware.com/news/releases/2011/5/jive-acquires-offisync-). We’re not replacing it. We’re not kicking it into a prematurely dug grave. Instead, we’re adding email to the list of ways we make it possible to engage employees on a single social business platform.

The death of email has been a topic for nearly a decade now. Whether a push for “No Email Fridays” we saw years ago, or a more recent move to an email free workplace, the topic keeps coming up.

 

death-of-email.png

Though I appreciate the noble pursuit of killing email, pondering the viability of email is a distraction. Sure, most of us would love to see email usage dwindle to the likes of the fax machine and desktop printer, but don’t expect to read email’s obituary anytime soon. In fact, most signs point to email being healthy for quite a while. Rather than focus on the death of email, let’s look at why we want email to die.

 

 

 

Most of us spend nearly 3 months a year in our inboxes, and because of this familiarity with email, we are all painfully aware that there must be a better way to collaborate.

 

As a Jiver I’m biased – I think everyone should use Jive to collaborate. But as sexy and intuitive as Jive is, and even in the most progressive and tech savvy organizations, 100% adoption isn’t a given without being prescriptive and deliberate. When you set out to make social collaboration better, you need to consider a broad set of different employees that span the tech adoption curve. Here’s where email (with a little help) becomes a friend to collaboration, rather than a foe to demolish.

 

 

Take Outlook for example. With about 600 million Office users around the world, what if you could bring all the power of cutting edge social collaboration technologies to people though an application they live in all day long, like email? What if you could connect employees without them having to learn a whole new system or application? What if employees could stay in their comfortable email system, but instead of keeping conversations locked away in their inboxes, they were able to share information and expertise without changing their habits?

 

What’s your take? Do you think bringing social capabilities into email is the way to go? Or do you prefer to stab it in the heart? If you want to kill it, how do you envision collaborating with employees, colleagues and partners?

marketing guy.jpg

 

Since joining Jive 82 days ago, I've been on a path of enlightenment.

 

Social Business enlightenment that is.

 

I've been a road-warrior on a journey to connect with people across industries, departments, and cities who are using our products to make measurable improvements at their organizations.

 

From  R&D to customer support, I heard business leaders describe how Social Business released them from the shackles of email jail and legacy systems.

 

Speaking as a former Jive customer, I can say with certainty that, in order to reach corporate nirvana, every department must embrace social.

 

The fabulous participants in our customer community contributed to an inclusive list of social activities by business unit, which served as the inspiration for this infographic.

 

Which socially enlightened character best represents you? Leave a comment below and download a copy of the attached infographic for your cube!


(click to enlarge)

social enlightenment.jpg


 

 

I'm excited that this Thursday I'll be joining Zach Hofer-Shall from Forrester Research, Michael Wu from Lithium, and David Carr from the Brainyard at InformationWeek to discuss the intersection of Big Data and social analytics at Enterprise 2.0 in Boston.

 

As David points out, Big Data and social analytics are among the most overused buzzwords in enterprise software today. We're going beyond the buzz and digging into the substance of what real business problems these technologies solve. Bottom line: the explosive growth in volume, velocity, and variety of enterprise data brings opportunities for businesses to extract new meaning and value.

 

The growthof Big Data is now merging with another key trend: the emergence of the enterprise social graph. Consumers today are bombarded with an ever-growing volume of information. Thanks to the innovation in the consumer technology space, new solutions from Amazon, Google, Facebook and Netflix have emerged with recommendation engines to map relevant data to consumer interests in advertising and marketing. There is a tremendous opportunity here to extend Big Data modeling and social analytics techniques to the enterprise thanks to Social Business Software systems.

 

As social applications are introduced inside enterprises, employee work and activity are available to watch and follow. These enterprise systems expose the minute by minute work of thousands of co-workers. They can show which teams collaborate, what their interests are, and the work they are currently focused on. This data is available for all the users in the company. When integrated with additional data sources both internal and external to the company, the same techniques that Netflix uses to recommend movies can be made to recommend the most important data in the enterprise. These technologies can funnel events from the back-end systems to the employees who are in the best position to take action on them. As a result, the walls between employees, partners and consumers are coming down. New, hybrid connections -- and by extension communities -- are forming in and between different stakeholders.

 

The enterprise social graph now includes, and increasingly requires, these dynamic relationships in getting business done, whether that's cooperative innovation between product designers and fans, collaborative problem solving between partners, or project silo-busting across orgs inside the enterprise. Those companies that can harness these relationships are finding a competitive edge over their rivals. It's the new way to business.

 

Social analytics and the science of relationships provide new ways to process and mine large scale, heterogeneous data, all of which are streaming at the speed of the Web. It's not just about monitoring the Social Web. It's about using new techniques to cut through the irrelevant noise in the enterprise to get work done. The future of work is personalized, giving people access to the right information and the right people at the right time, helping people weave their own new connections.

 

At Jive, we're working at the intersection of these powerful forces. We are bringing the best of consumer technology to the enterprise to change the way work gets done, increasing productivity while making work more fun and more personal. In the coming months, you'll see us using these techniques to power a new generation of smart, adaptive features in Jive, including supercharging our recommender, analytics, search and the Jive Social Media Engagement. All of this helps our customers unlock the value of the social graph in the enterprise and build the kind of critical social infrastructure that becomes a competitive advantage.

 

We'll explore some of these topics at our Enterprise 2.0 discussion this week. If you're at the show, join us on Thursday at 9:45 a.m. ET in Room 312!

 

 

As Jive’s Chief Social Scientist, David Gutelius is responsible for driving the enterprise social graph strategy. He was previously the CEO of Proximal Labs, a startup leveraging 'big data' for enterprise social networks that was acquired by Jive earlier this year. Prior to Proximal Labs, David was the co-founder and CTO at Social Kinetics. He additionally co-founded the Social Computing Group at SRI International's Aritificial Intelligence Center, and he served as the Product Manager on the DARPA CALO project -- the largest machine-learning project ever funded. David's background is in behavioral economics with a focus on social network theory. He was previously a visiting professor at Stanford University, and holds a Masters and PhD in economic history from Johns Hopkins.


You can find him on Twitter at @gutelius.

 

 

http://www.e2conf.com/boston/exhibitor-center/ent2-11_125x125-ImSpeakingAt.gif

This week, I'm heading to Boston to cheer on the Sox and talk about my favorite subject - Social Business.

Screen shot 2011-06-20 at 6.28.44 PM.png

I'm so excited to join other Jivers, awesome customers, prospects, and friends for a wicked-good time!

 

Here are the top 5 ways to connect with Jive at E2.0:

5. Play the Twitter Scavenger Hunt

Online or in-person, watch #jivehunt for Jive's #e20conf twitter scavenger hunt! From the expo hall to sessions and online activities, we’re handing out awesome prizes.

 

4. Stop by Booth 401

See demos of Jive 5 and Offisync in action!

 

3. Sit at the Cool Kids Table

On Tuesday, lunch is sponsored by Jive. Grab a bite to eat and gab with our customers and employees about Social Business.

 

2. Engage Jive Speakers

I'm thrilled to be joining awesome Jivers like co-founder Matt Tucker, SVP of Business Development Chris Morace, and our new Chief Social Scientist David Gutelius teaching people about the lastest in Enterprise 2.0.

 

1. Attend Jive Customer Sessions

Hear it firsthand from the leaders in Social Business as they discuss their success stories and lessons learned.

Amidst the buzz of social, mobile and cloud, many critical enterprise systems feel like old and ugly stepsisters. What's worse, their feet don't fit the shiny glass slippers that enamor our users. Face it – though critical, our old enterprise systems are not the belle of the ball.

 

Don’t worry. There’s a new way.

 

iStock_000014655644XSmall.jpgMost organizations I work with are giving their dowdy, but mission critical, enterprise applications a social life. How? They’re integrating common desktop applications like Notes, Outlook and Office, along with enterprise systems like salesforce.com and SharePoint, with their social business platform. They’re unlocking the information in these systems and using social business technology to get that data it in front of more eyeballs than ever before. The result: measurable gains in productivity and accelerated innovation.

 

Sure, maybe this sounds too good to be true, so spend a few minutes checking out the companies that have given their intranets a social life with Jive, or watch this Nike webinar about how they have integrated Jive’s social business platform with Documentum to help manage their brand around the world).

 

 

 

 

 


What's your take? Which of your systems and applications would benefit most by getting a social life? Vote here and see what other people are saying.

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