Death of Email.
The death of email has been a topic for nearly a decade now. Whether a push for “No Email Fridays” (http://www.marketwatch.com/story/fridays-at-veritas-casual-days-without-email) years ago, or a more recent move to an email free workplace (http://currents.michaelsampson.net/2011/02/being-email-free-atos-origin-sets-a-goal.html), the topic keeps coming up.
Though I appreciate the noble pursuit of killing email, pondering the viability of email is a distraction. Sure, most of us would love to see email usage dwindle to the likes of the fax machine and desktop printer, but don’t expect to read email’s obituary anytime soon. In fact, most signs point to email being healthy for quite a while.
Rather than focus on the death of email, let’s look at why we want email to die. Most of us spend nearly 3 months a year in our inboxes, and because of this familiarity with email, we are all painfully aware that there must be a better way to collaborate.
As a Jiver I’m biased – I think everyone should use Jive to collaborate. But as sexy and intuitive as Jive is, and even in the most progressive and tech savvy organizations, 100% adoption isn’t a given without being prescriptive and deliberate. When you set out to make social collaboration better, you need to consider a broad set of different employees that span the tech adoption curve. Here’s where email (with a little help) becomes a friend to collaboration, rather than a foe to demolish.
Take Outlook for example. With about 600 million Office users around the world, what if you could bring all the power of cutting edge social collaboration technologies to people though an application they live in all day long, like email? What if you could connect employees without them having to learn a whole new system or application? What if employees could stay in their comfortable email system, but instead of keeping conversations locked away in their inboxes, they were able to share information and expertise without changing their habits?
With Jive you can. We’re giving email a social life (http://www.jivesoftware.com/news/releases/2011/5/jive-acquires-offisync-). We’re not replacing it. We’re not kicking it into a prematurely dug grave. Instead, we’re adding email to the list of ways we make it possible to engage employees on a single social business platform.

The death of email has been a topic for nearly a decade now. Whether a push for “No Email Fridays” we saw years ago, or a more recent move to an email free workplace, the topic keeps coming up.

 

death-of-email.png

Though I appreciate the noble pursuit of killing email, pondering the viability of email is a distraction. Sure, most of us would love to see email usage dwindle to the likes of the fax machine and desktop printer, but don’t expect to read email’s obituary anytime soon. In fact, most signs point to email being healthy for quite a while. Rather than focus on the death of email, let’s look at why we want email to die.

 

 

 

Most of us spend nearly 3 months a year in our inboxes, and because of this familiarity with email, we are all painfully aware that there must be a better way to collaborate.

 

As a Jiver I’m biased – I think everyone should use Jive to collaborate. But as sexy and intuitive as Jive is, and even in the most progressive and tech savvy organizations, 100% adoption isn’t a given without being prescriptive and deliberate. When you set out to make social collaboration better, you need to consider a broad set of different employees that span the tech adoption curve. Here’s where email (with a little help) becomes a friend to collaboration, rather than a foe to demolish.

 

 

Take Outlook for example. With about 600 million Office users around the world, what if you could bring all the power of cutting edge social collaboration technologies to people though an application they live in all day long, like email? What if you could connect employees without them having to learn a whole new system or application? What if employees could stay in their comfortable email system, but instead of keeping conversations locked away in their inboxes, they were able to share information and expertise without changing their habits?

 

What’s your take? Do you think bringing social capabilities into email is the way to go? Or do you prefer to stab it in the heart? If you want to kill it, how do you envision collaborating with employees, colleagues and partners?