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It has been amazing to watch business functions evolve as the ‘social’ wave continues to make a splash (check out the The Path to Social Englightenment Infographic). One of the hot trends we’re hearing right now from our customers is a measurable uptick in efficiency and productivity as they apply social business software to their sales force.

 

Why?

 

The answer is actually quite simple. Sales is a largely a social function. You don’t sell to machines, you sell to people. You also  don’t sell alone – you need a team behind you to win. A fully  productive sales team needs access to the right information, the right  expertise and the right tools - in real time – to give them the edge to win. A social sales strategy needs to be pervasive, meaning it is not limited to a single sales use case. The ability to connect across  boundaries – partners, customers and employees – is absolutely critical  to take full advantage of the new way to business and can have a big impact on both direct and indirect sales channels.

 

How?

 

A picture is worth a 1000 words. We created the infographic below called “Any Given Sales Day” to illustrate the difference between the old and new way of selling.  You can download a copy for yourself as part of our Sales Enablement Toolkit.

 

We'd love to hear more stories.  How are you using Jive for sales enablement? Comment below.

 

http://files1.jivesoftware.com/images/infographics/any-given-sales-day-22106.png

 

Want to learn more about the new way to sell? Browse the Sales Enablement Toolkit.

Screen shot 2011-07-04 at 1.33.36 PM.pngEarlier this year, I participated in a social business conference the new-fashioned way -- remotely, via the Twitter stream. And I remember watching a compelling discussion about how human resource departments leverage emerging social business practices and the software that enables them.

 

It wasn't anything my customers haven't already shared, but it got me thinking:

 

In this world of recruiting, hiring, and rewarding individual contributors, how will HR need to change those practices to drive  social business behaviors across the enterprise?

 

What do you think?

Screen shot 2011-07-04 at 1.33.30 PM.pngOne of my former colleagues always said that good collaboration software should be present wherever people's eyeballs already are.

 

I'd say the same goes for internal corporate communications messages. And I'm not talking about emailing the entire organization.

 

For many of our customers, Jive has become that place.  Jive communities are often the single place where employees go, not only to get work done or find experts-- some call this employee-to-employee interaction--but also to stay connected to the company, or business-to-employee interaction. And that's because their Internal Communications team knows to put their messages where people are already hanging out.

 

Heck, Jive has become the entire intranet in some corporations!

 

One of my favorite examples is how Bupa, a healthcare and insurance services company with more than 52k employees, uses Jive to deliver Bupa World Magazine to their organization, as well as provide collaboration and networking capabilities.

 

Through their annual employee survey, Bupa found that employees who use Jive are 10% more satisfied and more engaged with the company, than those who don't use it. According to Gallup, more engaged employees lead to better business performance. No wonder Bupa won Corp Comms 2010 award for best use of digital media in internal communciations.

 

How is your organization making the transition from traditional internal communications practices to embrace Social Business?

Screen shot 2011-07-04 at 1.32.48 PM.png(Attribution to Duff Goldman from Food Network's Ace of Cakes for using his trademark slogan in our title. Thanks, Duff!)

 

What does it take to come up with a good idea? Sometimes, all you need is a good night's sleep and time to think. But for companies who live or die based on their ability to innovate, it takes much more, and on a grander scale.

 

Using Social Business Software, some of our customers have figured out how to scale their innovative efforts beyond traditional R&D teams, knowledge management systems, and customer focus groups.

 

They've recognized that:

 

* Innovation can happen anywhere, by anyone, not just in R&D;

* Innovative conversations get stuck in people's Sent Mail folder, lost to the ether after hanging up the phone, or never written down after a meeting; and

* People sometimes don't know what they know until someone asks them the right question (or, to quote one of my KM friends, "It's about the interaction, stupid.")

 

Companies using Social Business Software are able to cast a wider net for innovative ideas, not only among employees, but also with partners, customers, industry thought leaders, and more.

 

Take, for example, what Joe Bush from Cerner, a healthcare innovator, says:

 

A majority of our members, clinicians and IT staffers, simply want a  valuable way to connect, learn, and share with others like them.  The ER  physician in Seattle wants to know how he can decrease wait times for his patients through advanced queuing.  An ER physician in Tampa has done just that.  uCern [powered by Jive] helps establish that relationship as well as provide a community where that process can be shared with the physician in Seattle, as well as with thousands of other physicians in uCern.  uCern is not only Jive SBS technology, it is a highly connected web of  interactions across Cerner, our clients, and the complex healthcare environment, with information and relationships at the core.

 

How is your organization using Social Business Software to amplify innovation?

This week I got the chance to speak on a panel at the Cloud Computing World Forum in London (http://www.cloudwf.com/). Since the topic was Accelerating Enterprise Performance with Collaboration Technologies we spent most of the time tackling questions about adoption, ROI, compliance issues – the usual suspects. Someone in the audience (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_L._Perkins) raised a question that I’d love to hear more opinions on.
What do you think of a personal, moveable social profile? One you could use on consumer-oriented social networks like Facebook and Twitter, as well as on business-related networks like Jive and LinkedIn. One that moves with you as you leave and join different social networks. One that knows how to share the right information, appropriate for each network.
We aren’t far from this now, but it’s still early days – though we see glimpses, it’s apparent we’re working across separate profiles and systems. Here are a few current examples. With TweetDeck, I can send updates to any mix of Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn. With Jive I can see profile information and and activities from Jive, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter all from within Outlook. I can share new trips from TripIt with my Facebook friends. You get the picture.
What’s your take, what do you think of a single social profile that could traverse networks? How do you want it to work?This week I got the chance to speak on a panel at the Cloud Computing World Forum in London (http://www.cloudwf.com/). Since the topic was Accelerating Enterprise Performance with Collaboration Technologies we spent most of the time tackling questions about adoption, ROI, compliance issues – the usual suspects. Someone in the audience (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_L._Perkins) raised a question that I’d love to hear more opinions on.
What do you think of a personal, moveable social profile? One you could use on consumer-oriented social networks like Facebook and Twitter, as well as on business-related networks like Jive and LinkedIn. One that moves with you as you leave and join different social networks. One that knows how to share the right information, appropriate for each network.
We aren’t far from this now, but it’s still early days – though we see glimpses, it’s apparent we’re working across separate profiles and systems. Here are a few current examples. With TweetDeck, I can send updates to any mix of Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn. With Jive I can see profile information and and activities from Jive, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter all from within Outlook. I can share new trips from TripIt with my Facebook friends. You get the picture.
What’s your take, what do you think of a single social profile that could traverse networks? How do you want it to work?

I got the chance to speak on a panel at the Cloud Computing World Forum in London last week. Since the topic was Accelerating Enterprise Performance with Collaboration Technologies we spent most of the time tackling questions about adoption, ROI, compliance issues – the usual suspects. Someone in the audience raised a question that I’d love to hear more opinions on.

 

 

Profile.png

What do you think of a personal, moveable social profile? One you could use on consumer-oriented social networks like Facebook and Twitter, as well as on business-related networks like Jive and LinkedIn? One that moves with you as you leave and join different social networks? One that knows how to share the right information, appropriate for each network?

 

We aren’t far from this now, but it’s still early days – though we see glimpses, it’s apparent we’re working across separate profiles and systems. Here are a few current examples. With TweetDeck, I can send updates to any mix of Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn. With Jive I can see profile information and and activities from Jive, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter all from within Outlook. I can share new trips from TripIt with my Facebook friends. You get the picture.

 

What’s your take? What do you think of a single social profile that could traverse networks? How should it work?

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