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Will Rose has been in the Jive Community for four years now. In my mind, that makes him an expert here! I had to stalk him a little bit to give you a summary, since he and I have never worked together before this interview. Here's what I found.

 

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Will has been the enterprise community manager for T-mobile's external community which has around 60,000 users. His community, which serves T-mobile's customers, is on fire with content which reflects how hot mobile is in the world right now. How does Will manage it all? Find out by reading his interview below.

 

Libby: Where do you work (location, in the office, remotely, etc.)?

Will: I work for T-Mobile USA, the nation's 4th largest wireless service provider, and am based at our corporate headquarters in Bellevue, Washington.  Everything you've heard about Seattle weather is absolutely true!  9 months out of the year we're the most dedicated worker bees, but when that sun gods bless us, you'll likely find us on the lake.

 

LT: How would you describe your current job?

Will: I lead a team of technical wizards within the Knowledge Management organization which reports into Customer Service. We're something of a Shadow IT operation.  We do it all -- from requirements gathering and UI/UX design to development and deployment.  We take pride in saying "Yes!" when IT says "No".

 

LT: That's sounds pretty cool! How do you use Jive at work (internal, external, etc)?

Will: We've pretty much done it all (perhaps not all of it particularly well...) with Jive. With 8 Jive instances (7 hosted, 1 cloud), we have something for pretty much everyone. We have a more traditional Customer Support community (support.t-mobile.com) where we house both Support documentation and customer peer-to-peer discussions. And that's about where the 'traditional' use cases stop.  We have a community used primarily as a knowledge base for our front-line Customer Service (call center) and Sales (retail) representatives. We also have several communities which are more strictly 'locked down' and used as knowledge bases to support various 'partner brands' (see support.gosmartmobile.com) and retail partners (you know, like those kiosks you see in malls).  Seems weird to use a social software like Jive in a reduced or completely 'read-only' state, but we love how easy Jive has made it for us to customize the experience.

 

LT: What's your preference: Mac or PC (or something else)?

Will: Both? The Mac is my daily driver, but IT likes to remind me T-Mobile is a Windows shop. There aren't many folks at T-Mobile who use Macs... there are so few that  IT almost refuses to support them. To combat this, I started a Mac Users group in our community for us to connect and share workarounds. That VPN setup IT didn't know how to set up on a Mac? Documented! That cloud printing service that we were told would only work with a PC?  Documented!

 

LT: You really are a Shadow IT Hero! What mobile device do you use?

Will: iPhone 5s / iPad Air.  I used to be a hardcore Android user, flashing custom ROMs and whatnot, but I've given in completely to the will of Steve Jobs. The Apple ecosystem has me and I can't let it go.

 

LT: If I forced you to pick one word that best describes how you work, what would it be?

Will: "Maverick"

 

LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?

Will: Adobe Photoshop because we like to 'fake it til we make it'.

 

LT: Oh my gosh, me too. I can't live without PhotoShop! I'm an HTML widget queen. I love me some image maps.

 

LT: Besides your phone and computer, do you have a favorite gadget?

Will: My iPad. I haven't exactly gotten on the 'use my tablet for work' train yet, but it is great for playing games and surfing the ol' Interweb.

 

LT: What's your favorite to-do list manager?

Will: The sticky notes on my monitor.  If it aint there, it aint getting done!

 

LT: What you surround yourself with is important, what's your workspace like?

Will: Here, take a look!

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LT: Nice view! What's your best time-saving trick?

Will: If i saved any more time I think they'd question the need for my position!

 

LT: How do you balance work and life?

Will: I come in late and leave early. Seriously. I have a two-year old and try to maximize my time with him vs. maximizing the time the daycare has with him. That might mean I get to the office around 9 and try to start wrapping things up around 4. After he goes to bed though I pull the laptop back out and finish anything up I didn't get to or simply get a jump on the next day.

 

LT: That's exactly what I did when my kids were still little. It really makes things work better at home.

 

LT: Nice view! What do you listen to while you work?

Will: I'm pretty eclectic when it comes to music (sorry country fans, you can check your twang at the door) so the playlist can vary from The Beatles to 2Pac, Adele to Skrillex.  I try not to go directly from 'poppin a cap' to 'rollin in the deep', but you never know what can happen when you hit Shuffle.

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  Here's what happens when I put 2Pac a little too close to Adele and then shake them up in Photoshop. Plus I found some delicious mash-ups for your enjoyment (warning Tupac's language is not for the faint of heart):

 

LT: Thanks for giving me a nice diversion looking for 2Pac/Tupac/Adele mashups!


LT: Next question, what's your sleep routine like?

Will: Not awesome. I try to get to sleep by midnight and I'm back up around 6:30.

 

LT: Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?

Will: I'm the most extroverted introvert you'll ever meet!  x2 after I have a beer... or two...

 

LT: Would that make it extroverted introvert x4? Sounds like fun.

 

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received (and from whom)?

Will: Seek first to understand, then to be understood. Thanks Stephen Covey! The '5 Habits of Highly Effective People' is a great book.  I have to be honest, I didn't go into it thinking much of these 'corporate self-help' books, but this one was worth the read!

 

LT: Fill in the blank in the sentence below...

Will: I'd love to see Dennis Pearce answer these same questions.


To thank Will Rose for his responses to this interview, I've made him a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture his workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Facebook header photo-size in case he wants to highlight his workstyle there and can be popped into Twitter as a background image as well. Super handy.

Will Rose Workstyle.jpg


Remember back when you were a child and you heard older kids talking about summer camp and how fun it was?

The canoe races, the horseback riding... making crafts, swimming in the lake and sleeping under the stars... and don't forget the s'mores! It all sounded like heaven to me.


That's how I feel about JiveWorld14.

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   S'mores at JiveWorld? I say YES.

 

I've heard the stories about JiveWorld, wondered at the legends... Seen pictures that looked like a technicolor nightclub on steroids. Just like summer camp, I've always wanted to attend but never could get the trip approved.

 

The funny thing is, now that I'm working at Jive, I'm helping to plan JiveWorld14!

 

I'm in charge of Social Business Boot Camp, the day-long pre-conference training before JiveWorld begins. It's an appropriate assignment considering that Boot Camp is aimed at people new to Jive (either as prospects or new customers). So as far as the topics we are covering, I feel right at home.

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We're planning a lot of fun speakers and activities for our boot campers, so if you plan on attending JiveWorld14, be sure to indicate that you want to attend Boot Camp as well. It's part of the JiveWorld price of admission (in other words, it's FREE!).

 

When is Boot Camp?

 

Date: Tuesday, October 21 – 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM (BTW: JiveWorld's main sessions are Wednesday, October 22 - Thursday, October 23)

Where: The Cosmopolitan, Las Vegas


Why Attend?

 

  •     Hear real-world stories of social business success.
  •     Build the business case for launching social technologies at your organization.
  •     Understand how to win over executives, IT, legal, HR, business units and end users.
  •     Network with Jive customers and social business strategists who’ve been in your shoes.

 

By the way, if you are planning on attending JiveWorld14, the early bird registration ends July 31st! That's just days away, people! You better get on it!

 

So pack up your back pack, rinse out your canteen, bring your bug spray - then meet me at Boot Camp!

 

Register right now, in fact.

 

Just click the button below, you know you want to.

 

Want to see what happens at JiveWorld? You can watch video from last year's event at JiveWorld365!

Businesses; jobs and the workplaces are changing faster than ever before. Skills which were considered 'hot' until yesterday are no longer considered even special today. With the change in business due to competition and customers expectations soaring high; today the employees are evaluated on many additional parameters they aren’t even aware of. Fact is employees are constantly being observed to check if they have the critical yet unwritten 'virtues' to fit into the new roles & responsibilities needed for the organizations present success and future growth.

Follows 10... Oh! OK 9 signs that your career is getting 'killed' silently and you are gradually loosing the plot at the workplace without your knowledge.

 

1.If you are considered a Rambo…a one man army

You have won many awards in the past for great performance and have the personal ability to steer any project to success. You have always been a successful lone warrior. You never need anyone’s help and asking for help is a big embarrassment for you.
But you know; today’s work is too complex to be handled with just 'personal heroism'. Today’s businesses need 'collective' efforts & intelligence to succeed. You need to collaborate with your peers; customers & partners every time. Today your success in the organization would depend more on how connected; collaborative & 'social' you are and less on how 'capable' you are as an individual.

 

2. If you are always worried about your work-life balance

Your idea of work-life balance is a 9 to 5 job. You haven’t yet discovered that there is nothing like work life balance. Actually life & work are integral to each other. You cannot separate them. You have to build a 'synergy' to do justice to both your personal and work lives. They cannot be delimited by time. Fact of the matter is you could never win doing the 'balancing act'. You have to find ways how both gel well into a holistically rewarding experience for you.

3. If you and your desktop are inseparable

You have always loved your desktop computer. After all; it stores all software and documents you need for your work. You become uncomfortable if someone wants you to work on a 'cloud' application from a different computer. Where ever you are; you can start your work only when you are back at your desktop.

4. If for you work means phone calls; emails & face-to-face meetings

Your idea of work is to read/send emails; answer phone calls and if both don’t work have face to face meetings. You know these methods are big time wastes but you still continue with them. You are yet to catch up with the idea of using new communication methods like video chat; social collaboration & mobility at work. Remember, a meeting is an event where ‘minutes’ are taken and hours wasted. " A conference call = 1 person talking and 26 people continuing to do their email” says Dr. Eddie Obeng a well known business guru.

5. If you find downloading Apps on your phone and using them cumbersome

You have a gleaming smartphone in your pocket but that’s only to attend calls and send emails. You don’t search or download apps in it to make your work easy. You wonder why the millennials in your office often ask you ' Why do you do this manually. Don’t you have an app for it?’

6. If you often wonder why some people bother so much about 'virtual' badges; levels or points

For you the perfect incentive is only bonuses & cash awards. You are motivated only when you get a salary hike or a promotion. Winning online badges & points doesn’t make sense for you. You are not able to figure out why someone would strive for 'recognition' as an 'expert' without any monetary rewards.

7. If you keep new ideas too close to your chest

You keep your ideas to yourself waiting for the perfect time to unleash it before the senior most guys. You feel they might get 'stolen' by your colleagues if you share them on employee’s internal social network.

8. If you trust on your conventional wisdom only and not on ‘data’.

Old perceptions are fading fast and what we have always considered right is turning out to be big myths. Thanks to the massive data today people easily have access to. No doubt your intuition/gut feelings are important but they need the support of data insights too.

9. Last but not least; if you still aren’t convinced that it could happen in 2015.

Great that you are an optimist! Loosing the job doesn’t necessarily mean you would immediately stop getting the paychecks. But the process could start in any or all of the following ways:

a)You getting isolated within the team

b) You not being included in important projects

c) You being sent on forced sabbatical

d) You not taken to customer meets

e) Millennials stopping interactions with you

f) Your boss & senior management start ignoring you.

 

If there is evidence of above signs in your work it simply indicates that you are gradually loosing your battle at the workplace and it should be addressed urgently. It makes a lot of sense to get pumped up and be the change agent for your self.

Ryan Rutan needs no introduction, but I'm going to give him one anyway!

 

In the Jive Community, he has acted as the Community Manager, key app developer, and general rockstar Jiver. People flock to him to get his autograph at JiveWorld and his all-night hack-a-thons have changed lives (at least that's what the legends say). And while we won't go into his personal life here, I have proof that he is an overall amazing human being.

 

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    If Jive were a kingdom, Ryan would definitely be the crown prince.


Let's find out what a day-in-the-life of Ryan looks like below.

 

Libby Taylor: Hey Ryan, you've had a huge impact on the Jive Community. My endless thanks to you! Let's get down to business, we know you work for Jive, but where do you conduct your magic?

Ryan: I live (and work) in the greatest city in the world.  Austin, TX. Where technology instinctively flocks like the salmon of Capistrano!

 

LT: And what is your current gig (besides being amazing)?

Ryan: Currently I am Jive's Developer Evangelist, which allows me to work with some of the best customers, partners and prospects to talk about social business problems and how to build solutions using the Jive Platform.  #winning

 

LT: How do you use Jive at work (internal, external, etc)?

Ryan: The easiest answer I can give is the number: 118. That is the average number of tabs of Jive that I have open on my computer at home on any given day (for realz). Jive allows me to execute on work at a pace that rivals the speed at which I think. So how do I use Jive?  Ever-presently!

 

LT: I'm almost afraid to ask because I can only imagine your work space, what computer system do you use?

Ryan: Fully Loaded 3.4Ghz Quad-Core Ivy Bridge iMac with 3 x 27" Monitors. When I travel, I have to use my laptop, an iPad and iPhone in tandem to feel as though I'm not being 1/3 less productive.

 

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   I don't know, I think I see space for at least another monitor or maybe a few more devices. #multitasking


LT: I can almost answer this question myself by looking at your desk.. what is your current mobile device situation:

Ryan: It is no secret, I am a Mac addict.  I am currently rocking an iPhone 5s, and have plans to reintroduce a wrist watch to my arm when the iWatch is released.  A bit much?  Probably, but I'm OK with that. =)


LT: And don't forget your iPad too...


LT: What one word best describes your work style?

Ryan: Efficient. When it comes to work, I find that doing one thing at a time is boring. If I don't have multiple things in motion, I lose track of what's going on. Fun fact: I've set the high score on every Speed of Light machine I've ever played. =)


LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?

Ryan: First on the list is definitely multiple monitors. I don't care what people say, but square footage of monitor real-estate trumps any multitasking software. Next would definitely be a solid Terminal window implementation with transparent background, because sometimes you just need to see what's going in the background. When it comes to software, there's a tie for 3rd between the OS X's spotlight launcher (can't wait for Yosemite!!!!!) and Google Chrome, but to throw one more piece of hardware on the list ... it would have to be my split key natural keyboard(s) by Microsoft. (That last one is hard for me to say aloud, thank you for listening).


LT: Not to beat the tech topic into the ground but besides your phone, iPad, multiple screens and computer, what gadget can't you live without?

Ryan: That's pretty hard, but I think I would have to say my WiFi/Router, but a close second is my Apple TV.  I remember back in the day running coax cables for token ring networks, tripping over tangled cables and installing clunky network cards. Nowadays, I have to worry more about channel interference and what to name my WiFi hot spot so my neighbors think I'm cool. My neighbor has his named "FBI Surveillance Van" ... I'd love to get suggestions on how to top that!

 

LT: Maybe Jive Community members can add name suggestions for your WiFi hot spot in the comments below!

 

LT: You seem to get a lot done in a little time. What's your favorite to-do list manager?

Ryan: Hands down, it is Evernote. Usually my to-do's are so scattered, but Evernote makes it super simple for me to record notes via text, pictures or even sound ... and I can easily follow-up on said items and knock them off the list. Besides that, I would have to say my brain, as I tend to process and retain most of my to-do's there for a while before they make it to Evernote (and I like it that way).

 

LT: Although we've already seen a picture of it, would you like to comment on what it's like to work in your workspace?

Ryan: In any given day/week, my workspace goes from immaculate to cluttered, to stacked to unbalanced, to messy to just enough room, to time to push it all off into a box, to digging through the box, to putting things from the box in their right place and back to immaculate.  It's a vicious cycle!

 

LT: What's your best time-saving trick?

Ryan: Don't solely rely on asynchronous communication to get things done, like approvals. Most times, time spent waiting and tracking down people to get approvals on their own time wastes time and keeps things in the forefront longer than they need to be. Take the extra minute, track the person down (by IM, phone, carrier pigeon) and let them know that you are reaching out to them. If the person isn't there, find someone in the office that you know works on their team or sits near the person and ask them to let that person know you are looking for them. The time you save in back and forth missed connections adds up fast!

 

Ryan: Also, trust your instincts and don't second guess. Don't be afraid of being wrong or putting your thoughts out into the open for others to see and contribute. The more we share, the more we work better together!

 

LT: Besides the hum of all those monitors, what do you listen to while you work?

Ryan: It depends. If I'm doing creative writing, then I can't listen to music by my favorite artists; otherwise, I would bust out into song and rock the mouse like a microphone all too often.  So I tend to listen to disposable interchangeable upbeat modern artists during the day to keep my brain firing, and when I want to relax...I chillax to the Counting Crows!  (Side note: I've got back stage passes to meet them on July 30th, so that will be awesome.)

 

LT: What's your sleep routine like?

Ryan: Minimal. Plenty of time to sleep when you are dead. Prior to marriage and family life, I averaged about 4 hours of sleep a night, I'm up to a solid 6 now, but I only do so for the safety of others. =)

 

LT: I'm fairly sure I would die on 4 hours of sleep a night. Six would still be tough.

 

LT: Personality-wise, are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?

Ryan: I've been clinically tested as both an introvert and extrovert, and I have the sticker(s) to prove it!

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received?

Ryan: Ask big ... get big. There is no harm in going big on an ask, the worst that can happen is that they say no. Be confident and do not shy away from something you want, especially if you know that you are capable of putting in the work to achieve it.

 

LT: Thanks for a great interview, Ryan! Who would you like to be interviewed next?

Ryan: Weird Al Yankovic (the most versatile and talented musician of all-time)

 

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  Yeah... sorry Ryan, interviewing Weird Al is just not going to happen. Fun idea though.

 

 

To thank Ryan Rutan for his responses to this interview, I've made him a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture his workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Twitter header photo-size in case he wants to highlight his workstyle there. I know it looks gigantic, but it'll look great once he pops it into Twitter and sizes it...

 

Ryan Rutan Workstyle.jpg

    If you would like to participate in the How I Work series and get a cool #workstyle graphic like the one above, just let me know!


I think all of our folks in the Developer group should see this too!

Ever wonder what it takes to succeed with online community strategy and operations?  Here are 56 lessons learned culled from 20 years of online community building experience.

 

  1. To succeed at online community building, your organization must be able to give members a reason to convene – online or offline.
  2. Take time to validate your community strategy with prospective members. They will likely help you make important adjustments to the plan.
  3. The sponsoring organization must create a balance of “gives” to members and “gets” from members – no community can be one-sided; every community is collaborative.
  4. Involve stakeholders across lines of business and the organization as a whole when determining what the community must accomplish.
  5. Create a vision statement that is clear, aspirational and achievable.
  6. Share the vision statement within the community so members know what to expect.
  7. Define your audience clearly – who the community intends to serve will dictate how you go about serving them.
  8. Create a 90-day operational plan for community; revise it every 90 days.
  9. The Big Idea: People come for content and stay for community.
  10. Start with an emphasis on institutional content, then plan the shift to organic (user generated) content.
  11. Get to know your industry influencers on and offline.
  12. Engage your industry influencers early and often.
  13. Bring legal into community planning before you launch.
  14. Make sure your organization’s social media policy is in effect and your people are trained on what it really means.
  15. Create clear KPIs for the community and socialize them well.
  16. Be sure community success measures are aligned with (at least!) 1 strategic goal of the organization.
  17. Don’t expect a miracle. Communities take time to grow.
  18. Communities can generate revenue with the right business model in place.
  19. Cost reductions can be a short-term win for a community, but long-term ROI is built on innovations, process improvements, increased customer satisfaction and R&D.
  20. Know your community’s business goals  before shopping for a software vendor. Otherwise you could be buying a boat when you need to cross the desert.
  21. Map your business requirements to the software offering’s strengths to enable the right choices.
  22. Don’t expect community software to meet your all your needs straight out of the box.
  23. Know the difference between B2B online community best practices and B2C best practices — they are different. Very different.
  24. Decide early which online community model you will adopt: public, gated or hybrid.
  25. If your organization is not good at customer engagement, an online community won’t solve the problem. In fact, it will make your flaws more visible. To everyone.
  26. Start with a beta group of friendlies before launching your community to the world.
  27. Hire skilled online community managers and treat them with professional respect.
  28. Don’t launch the community until you have an online community manager in place.
  29. If you don’t let staff speak directly to your biggest client in the offline world, don’t let them run the community.
  30. Member acquisition for an online community is not a marketing campaign.
  31. Prospective community members don’t respond well to highly-graphical invitations. They think it is marketing spam.
  32. Prepare a weekly or monthly newsletter – it will drive about 60% of your traffic in the first year.
  33. Outreach often to members to invite them into discussions. They are unlikely to come in on their own at first.
  34. Create an outreach database to log member interactions: who, when, why, what happened?
  35. Use the “three bears” model for member outreach: not too much, nor too little. Just right means testing, watching and responding  to member behavior, tenure and intimacy.
  36. Create an editorial calendar for the community. You need to know where content is coming from and when it is going online.
  37. Make sure you have low risk (e.g. polls), mid risk (comments, document sharing) and high risk (discussions, interviews) features in  the community.
  38. Think through the process impact of features and document workflows to ensure closed-loop cycles.
  39. Members who upload a photo in the profiles area are 7X more likely to post in the future.
  40. Establish a baseline for key measures before the community starts so you know when success happens.
  41. Develop an “inner circle” of select members who will form the core of the community and keep it growing over time.
  42. Ask your members’ opinion about topics that matter. They are smart and insightful and can help you steer the ship.
  43. Integrate the community operations into the lines of business.  Communities can help fuel conference attendance, support new product launches and identify early market trends.
  44. Share your findings strategically. If you spot a trend or a customer dissatisfaction issue brewing, let the business know.
  45. Keep your executives informed on community successes as well as challenges.
  46. Make every-day heroes out of your members – let them tell their story.
  47. Don’t use a community to sell to members.  They will be disappointed and will stop participating.
  48. Measure what matters. Your community will become what you measure — plan accordingly.
  49. Give your online community a “health check” every 6-9 months to ensure you are making progress on your chosen goals.
  50. When discussions are quiet, talk to yourself online. Eventually someone will empathize and join the conversation.
  51. Don’t take down posts you don’t agree with. Instead, engage in the conversation with transparency.
  52. Put a crisis management plan in place as well as a clear triage process. It will save you pain in the long run.
  53. Use the community to do research on topics that matter to members and your company. Everybody wins.
  54. Blend offline and online member engagement whenever possible.
  55. Even the busiest of members will participate if they find value in the community.
  56. Community is the epicenter of customer engagement.  Let your members know they are heard and respected.

So you've got yourself an online community and need someone to take care of it... Considering the recent wave of Web 2.0 technologies and the advancement of community and forum-type platforms, you think it would be easy to find someone who can head up a community, right?

Not even close.

 

The job of community manager is a fairly new one and often encompasses a wide range of roles and responsibilities. Finding just the right person to fit the bill can be a challenge. Starting with the right job description is critical to making the right hire for the position. The bottom line is that you won't find someone who can do every single thing on your list. You'll need to know up-front which responsibilities are more critical to your community than the others.

 

DETERMINE WHAT YOU NEED

Consider these points when writing up the job description:

  • What level of project management will your Community Manager need? Is this a senior position where the CM will drive the strategy for an enterprise community consisting of thousands of users? Or is this role for an already established community where there are others driving the direction of the program?
  • What are the specific skills needed to manage your community effectively? For some communities, the CM will need to be able to do a little bit of everything. From graphic design, to writing, to analytics, you will have to determine which of the broad range of activities are most important for your community manager.
  • Is the position internally or externally facing? If your community manager will be dealing with customers on a regular basis then the job description needs to highlight that factor. On the other hand, if your community manager will need to navigate the inner workings of company politics, then that's another skill set altogether.

 

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIESTechnical resource.jpg

Here's a list of possible Community Manager roles and responsibilities:

  • Help desk: Respond to user questions, help on-board new groups. Act as a technical expert for the community. Elevate questions that cannot be answered to your support team.
  • Teacher/trainer: Create help documents, videos, and host events where users are trained on how to make the most of your platform. Get ready for a lot of change management in this part of the role.
  • Hand-holder: To nurture engagement you have to hold some hands. Connect with users, encourage their activity, ensure questions have a response.
  • Project Manager – Communities don’t build themselves. There needs to be somebody who's got the big picture in mind. You’re going to be responsible for creating and delivering all kinds of reports, briefings, fact sheets, and metrics and you’re going to need a plan for how to meet those deadlines and still engage with the community itself.
  • Consultant: Groups will come to you to find out how they can best use the community to get work done. You'll need to be prepared to act as both experts and adviser in these consultations.
  • Writer: From blog posts to help documents, the community manager should have a voice and writing skills to back it up.
  • Cheerleader: Enthusiasm for the job and the community are a must have! Your community should feel the love and positive energy. Celebrate community successes.
  • Graphic designer: You want your site to look pretty, don't you? Having graphic design skills can make your community manager a superstar in your organization. Let's face it, everyone wants to look good.
  • Referee: At times, you might need to step in between users or else make the call on whether something should or should not be posted. At the end of the day, you want everyone to make nice and get along. Or at least agree to disagree.
  • Marketeer: Advertise activities to promote new users and engage returning visitors. You might even need to advertise outside your community in order to draw people in.
  • Psychologist: For many, blogging in a community is an act of self-exposure that is uncomfortable to some people. You might have to help people, especially executives, overcome their fear of being that transparent.
  • Party host: Your community is the longest running party you will ever plan and attend. Your job is to make sure the fridge is stocked, drinks are flowing, and music is playing all night long. You'll also have to make sure the room looks good and the invites are send and resent as needed.
  • Comedian: Let's face it, life is better when you are having fun. Make your community laugh once in a while, it's good for them and boost engagement. Comedy can also stir up things when content gets stale.
  • Leader: Admit it, you can't do everything yourself. By engaging other people to help you with certain aspect of your community, you'll be building a strong network of advocates who will keep your community alive when you need to do things, like sleep, for example.
  • Advocate: When bugs pop up, and they always do, you'll need to raise the issue up with developers to get them fixed. Or when things can't be fixed, explaining the situation and smoothing feathers in the may be required.
  • Ambassador: If your site is customer-facing, your community manager should be ready to be the brand and speak to the decisions and key strategies of your company.
  • Analyst: Behind every community is a pile of numbers, numbers that need slicing and dicing to make up the reports that the sponsors of your community will demand.
  • Police man: Monitor posts and moderate as needed: Keep a watchful eye on the community. Provide rapid response for inappropriate or flagged posts. Deactivate or delete users when necessary.
  • Janitor: Every good party needs some clean up every once in a while. From dead groups to out of date content, regular cleaning of the community is necessary for the health and wellness of your site.

 

Here's a good example of a community manager job description:

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JOB DESCRIPTION - EXAMPLE

Jive is seeking a socially savvy and driven individual to champion the use of our own products to the benefit of our employees in the Brewspace community. The enterprise community manager will consult with individual business units to develop a plan to optimize the use of the internal community to meet the needs for collaboration as well as help our employees better engage with customers. This individual will be responsible for the strategy and management of Jive's social intranet and develop strong relations with the external senior community manager to execute on a single strategy for community management. The internal community manager will report to the Sr. Social Media Manager.

 

General Responsibilities:

    • Determine strategy for home page architecture and design
    • Engage closely with each business unit to consult on how to get the most value out of the community
    • Develop a plan for community improvements and how new use cases will be brought on board.
    • Define and set measurable goals for each major Jive community. 
    • Mentor and advise designated space/group community managers to help them curate and optimize their respective social channels
    • Develop and/or facilitate employee-wide trainings on community best practices
    • Help define and enforce consistent governance policies
    • Lead by example in promoting an open, positive and active employee community
    • Motivate and engage users daily; create excitement around community initiatives
    • Work with the help desk to identify issues and track them through to resolution
    • Coordinate with marketing to represent community management best practices and case studies to external audiences via blog posts, presentations, etc.
    • Develop of network of community advocates to help champion best practices and groups.
    • Work closely with Jive product management to triage and funnel user requirements for inclusion into the product road map when appropriate
    • Create and manage social rewards and recognition program for employees
    • Develop and report metrics consisting of both qualitative and quantitative measurements that helps Jive evaluate collaboration
    • Stay up to date on the latest social trends

Qualifications:

    • Excellent organizational, writing, and presentation skills
    • 5-7 years project management experience
    • Open and honest communication skills
    • Hands-on and self-driven
    • Passionate about community best practices, principles, concepts, and technologies
    • Ability to work collaboratively with a geographically-distributed workforce
    • Ability to work across all functional organizations as well as levels in the organization
    • Basic UI/UX design knowledge
    • Multi-tasker who understands how to develop tactical plans that align with the company's strategy

 

Before you cut and paste this position word-for-word, remember that your community is a living, breathing organism that deserves the best community manager you can find. This list should only be a starting point.

 

In the end, finding a community manager that fits the job requirements and company culture is up to you.

Good luck!

 

 

Sources:

Community Manager Job Description, A Definitive Guide « Social Fresh

The Many Roles of an Internal Community Manager | Social Media Strategery

 

Cross-posted in: Internal Communities External Communities The specified item was not found.

Rachel Duran is no newcomer to community management. She's written some excellent blogs in the Jive Community including 5 Tips for Becoming an Expert in Your Community and also 5 Reasons Why An Internal Community May Not Be Right For You. She'll also be speaking at JiveWorld14 for a session called Connect the Dots: How RadioShack created viral internal engagement.

How I Work - Rachel image.jpg

    Rachel's got enthusiasm you can almost smell. Okay, maybe you can't smell it, but you sure can FEEL it.

 

Get the feeling for what it's like to be in Rachel's shoes by reading more below!

 

Libby Taylor: Let's start with the obvious, where do you work?
Rachel: I work for the RadioShack Corporation. RadioShack is an international electronics retailer with 4,500 company-operated stores in the U.S. and Mexico and over 900 dealer and partner locations worldwide. The company was founded in 1921 (93 years old!) and is based in beautiful Fort Worth, TX.

 

LT: And what do you do?
Rachel: I am one of our two community managers (shoutout to ahawkins) that are dedicated specifically to our two Jive communities. Our internal community launched at the end of April 2014 and has over 15,000 registered users today, with a 60% active rate. That community is like my third child! Our associates and field leaders amaze me every day with their brilliance and passion, and even our CEO gets in on the fun daily. Our external mobile support community is a great place to get answers for your techy woes.

 

LT: How do you use Jive (internal, external, etc)?
Rachel: Today, we are very focused on our internal community. My responsibilities lie primarily in adoption, engagement, and content management strategies. I spend my days evaluating community needs for content placement and governance; managing our executive engagement program; planning gamification strategies; working with other departments to form contests and engagement strategies; facilitating training for the community; and managing the moderator team.

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    Rachel in action: Presenting on the internal community and gamification at RadioShack's field leadership summit.


LT: Mac or PC?
Rachel: I have a Windows laptop that I can dock/undock quickly (perfect for those emergency meetings). But when I'm docked at my desk, I love my huge side monitor. I need to see all things at once!!

 

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   Rachel also needs to see what's happening outside and she has a huge window to do so. #windowenvy

 

LT: What's your mobile device?
Rachel: I have an iPhone 5s. My recent upgrade decision revolved heavily around my need for the new Jive app, since we run our internal community on Jive 7. iPhones are easy to use; I'm a PC girl, but my phone has to be Apple.

 

LT: Pick one word that best describes how you work.
Rachel: Fervidly

 

LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?
Rachel: Like I said, I HAVE to have the Jive app. When you run a community, you have to be able to consume content and navigate the way your users do. That practice I've had for years and it's saved me from running into huge problems with adoption and training. I also LOVE Pixlr. It's fantastic for whipping up a visual tool for a Jive Doc. And I absolutely cannot live without Google Docs!

 

LT: Do you have a favorite gadget?
Rachel: I don't leave the house without my RadioShack key-chain power bank. I have a double USB car charger that charges the key-chain and my phone and the same time, so I always have backup emergency power!

 

LT: Do you have a favorite to-do list manager?
Rachel: I love the Calendars 5 app. I have to see color coded tasks, events, and personal all in one place or I over commit easily.

 

LT: What you surround yourself with is important.  What is your workspace like?
Rachel: It's very colorful and bright! That keeps my disposition quite cheery. It also has reminders of my favorite things, like tons of pics of my kiddos and hubby, my companion cube cookie jar, and my Borderlands 2 art book.

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    Impossible not to be cheery looking at that baby face.

 

LT: Pictures are important, so is sound... do you listen to music while you work?
Rachel: I listen to a lot of metal and dubstep/rap; Bring Me The Horizon and Big Chocolate are my go-to energy boosters. I also get down to Beyonce's new album, but I have to be careful not to start randomly singing out loud with my headphones on!

 

LT: Can you share your best time-saving trick?
Rachel: Delegation. You're not always the best person to implement your vision. I recognize and deploy pieces of my big picture to those who know how to make them happen best.


LT: How do you balance work/life?

Rachel: This is always a tough one, especially when your job is in social media sites that have an app! My moderators are trained and empowered to handle minor upsets and are fantastic about escalating major issues appropriately. Standard operating procedures combined with rewarding and empowering your best users are key to being able to put down the phone and enjoy your family, friends, or you time.

 

LT: I almost hate to ask this since I see you have a baby... What's your sleep routine like?
Rachel: Yes, I have an 8-month-old, so my sleep is anything but routine.

 

LT: Sleep deprivation can be torture, so let's move on...  Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?
Rachel: Extrovert, for sure! I thrive on sharing ideas with others. I'm not afraid of being silly or grabbing the mic.

 

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received?
Rachel: I received this advice from my CEO at Ilfusion Creative (where I was the Director of Social Media Strategy): "You can't fall on every sword. Pick the battles that most need to be won, and fight those with the full fury of your passion." I want everything to be exactly right, but have had to learn to love the art of process.

 

LT: Fill in the blank...

Rachel: I'd love to see ___ Will Rose ___  answer these same questions.


LT: Pretty cool stuff. Check out this photo of Radio Shack's social media command center when they ran the surprise Super Bowl ad! (That's Rachel in the front, left)

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To thank Rachel Duran for her responses to this interview, I've made her a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture her workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Facebook timeline cover-size in case she wants to highlight her workstyle there.

 

Rachel Duran Workstyle.jpg

   If you would like to participate in the How I Work series and get a cool #workstyle graphic like the one above, just let me know!

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