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Business 2.0 with Jive

Posted by mnevill Champion Aug 15, 2014

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Do you remember when the Internet was just taking off?  If you could find what you were looking for you would bookmark the site, print it out, AND download a local copy just to make sure you would have it again.  It was not really easy for anyone to share knowledge or ask and answer questions.  Fast forward many years later and all the sudden you could publish a website, a video, or collaborate with anyone around the world to create useful consumable content.  Google was born along the way to replace Infoseek, Altavista, and

Logo_2013_Google.pngeverything else to become the way to find anything anywhere instantly.  Google replaced all our bookmarks and personal files and we liked it that way. 

 

Unfortunately today our businesses are stuck in the same trap that the Internet started out in.  We have information and content, but it is stuck in file folders and Outlook PST files, and you can’t find them not to mention easily share them to help others.  The good news is Jive came along and became the Google for our businesses.  Now there is an easy way to ask and answer questions, share documents, and much more.  Just like Google, with Jive you can find everything you need instantly.  The Internet evolved, why can’t our businesses?  If you share it, they will find it with Jive.

Meet Doug MacKay of Critical Mass. He's inspired other members of the Jive Community with his enthusiasm and knowledge and was suggested for this interview by our first interviewee, Rachel Duran. I think that Doug has the workstyle question SOLVED, folks. And if you have any doubts, check out the photo below which shows where he was working from last week! I don't want to spoil it though, so let's start at the beginning.


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Libby: Where do you work (location, in the office, remotely, etc.):

Doug: I'm working at the headquarters of Critical Mass, a global marketing agency, in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Mostly I work in the office but it seems lately that I'm working all the time: at home and mobile. The interesting thing is that the idea of work is changing. While it's pervasive, the load sometimes diminishes to the point where I can enjoy the outdoors AND keep working.

 

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   The ultimate office view.

 

LT: So, what's your current gig?

Doug: I'm currently playing as the Director of Information Systems at Critical Mass, which is a lot of fun as I get to solve global issues for all of our employees and valued clients. I get to do everything from forming our #UserCentricIT strategy and budgeting to personal on-boarding training for new employees.

 

LT: How do you use Jive at work (internal, external, etc)?

Doug: We've been living Jive internally now for almost 4 years. It's been a wild ride of successes. We're now piloting externally accessible spaces and Box integrations so we're extending our hub.

 

LT: Mac or PC (or something else)?

Doug: As an agency we're all over the place! Mostly a Mac shop for creatives but we do everything so we have PCs as well. Of course, there's always something else but I won't bore you with Solaris and Linux!

 

LT: How about your mobile device?

Doug: I just switched over from my old iPhone4S to a brand-spanking-new rockin' HTC One M8! Wicked! I really loved my iPhone, but I'm amazed with my HTC. Just wish it would work with iPhoto.

 

LT: If you had to pick one word, how would you best describe how you work?

Doug: Focused. Our systems are mission critical so that dictates my world.

 

LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?

Doug: Oh no. Now you'll know how geeky I can be. Yeeesh! Well, Apache Directory Studio, Chrome, OneLogin, Jive, BoxSync, Terminal, TextMate, and Adium. I find Chrome just works better, you know?  Easier, faster and simple. With all of these tools there's a lot of complexity so I need a simple clean work to wield the tools.

 

LT: Your tech-geekiness doesn't scare me! Let's keep going... Besides your phone and computer, do you have a favorite gadget?

Doug: Well, it's summertime so my favorite gadget is my BBQ!

LT: And that's not a tech gadget at all!

 

LT: What's your favorite to-do list manager?

Doug: Now we're getting personal. I'm old-school so I use an stack of paper. I write things down. Sure, I've got Notes and Reminders and Calendars but to-do's are easier to scratch off and pour coffee onto.

LT: I totally get it, I have to admit that I'm a fan of the old-fashioned notebook. Go figure.

 

LT: I already saw your vacation office from the photo, so what's your daily workspace like?

Doug: It's rather purposeful. We're entirely digital here and move around a lot, so culturally our desks aren't expressions of individuality. It takes too long to clean up!  Mostly I have a screen to do all my work and a phone (or two) to reach out.

 

LT: What do you listen to while you work?

Doug: We're nimble and responsive here. There's music playing all the time but it's Songza! Otherwise we're open concept and talk all the time. I only bring on the Katy Perry when I need to concentrate.

LT: That's hilarious.

 

LT: So what's your best time-saving trick?

Doug: Focus. I'm legendary here at focusing to the point of not hearing my co-workers. That's without headphones. It's kind of embarrassing, really.

 

LT: And how do you balance work and life?

Doug: I ensure that if anyone can work remotely it's got to be the IT team. After all, if we can't do it right for a digital agency then we're not doing our jobs. So that means I split my time between office and home. It keeps my family happy even though I might be on the deck with my laptop. I also make sure to silence my phone for non-work hours and only let emergency calls come through. It streamlines life.

 

LT: What's your sleep routine like?

Doug: LOL, I'm a Dad so I have the superhuman ability to sleep anywhere, at any time.  Gimme a sec...Zzzzzzzz....

LT: I am fairly sure that moms have the exact opposite superhuman ability of waking up at the slightest sound. I'm a little jealous.

 

LT: Almost done... Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?

Doug: Both. I think that INTJ's don't have to be always "I" but can move into the "E" given the right circumstances. I lean more "I". Maybe 11 out of 20...

 

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received (and from whom)?

Doug: Really two things: Do whatever you want, but make sure you're the best as you can be at it. And something I've learned over time as a parent: Treat everyone like they are your kids and they'll love you back.

 

LT: Fill in the blank.

Doug: I'd love to see John Schwiller answer these same questions.

 

To thank Doug MacKay for his responses to this interview, I've made him a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture his workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Facebook header photo-size in case he wants to highlight his workstyle there and can be popped into Twitter as a background image as well. Super handy!

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Right now, there are 431 LinkedIn job listings for “community managers,” including the opening that I posted last week.

 

As I scoured through my hiring competition today, I felt my Irish rage starting to bubble up to the surface.  You see, I’m passionate about treating community management as a true profession; yet, it’s clear by the job descriptions online that many organizations still don’t “get it.”

 

The solution is simple. As a profession, we need to develop relevant terminology and career paths to explain the variety of community management positions in terms of experience level, salary, qualifications, and responsibilities.


Day-to-day, the responsibilities of community managers differ greatly based on their level.  Pulling from my inner video game nerd, I've created the following examples below:

 

 

1. Apprentice (entry-level): meet-and-greet new members, moderate conversations, approve membership requests, facilitate networking, manage SPAM, monitor site activity, enforce policies

2. Journeyman (specialist): create content, measure and report metrics, build relationships with advocates, reward positive behaviors, recruit members, research trends

3. Grandmaster (expert): optimize platforms, manage place owners, create internal trainings, host community events and programs, develop policies

4. Promethean (master): integrate community cross-functionally, provide strategic direction, manage resources and budget, represent the community internally, coach executives, determine road-map

 

The important thing is that all of these roles are working towards one common, visible, set of measurable objectives.


When I took on my first community manager role in 2006, I had one focus: to build quality relationships between the brand and its' advocates.  Now, community has touch points across the buyer journey, customer life-cycle, and employee career path.  It's key that we give this role and all social responsibilities the respect they deserve.

 

I’m curious to hear from you!  Share your take on the different roles and levels of community management in the comments below.

 

P.S. If you're interested in hiring a community manager, Libby Taylor wrote a post on How to write a Community Manager job description.

Technology by itself is not going to be enough to make a workforce more productive -- it requires a clear line of site to business value.

 

Let's start by looking at the state of business today: businesses have developed and implemented over-engineered, automated processes.  And in the quest to create productivity, we now have the 24 hr workday.

 

We need to figure out how to go on this "productivity" quest, but in a fundamentally different direction. Looking back at the last 60 years, we have been cranking 100% growth in productivity every two decades. The punchline is that we have now reached a point where it is just not working. There isn't an option not to be more productive. Industry opportunity and competition drive a treadmill dynamic that is always accelerating. We streamlined process and then over-engineered it. We automated as many things as we could. We even gave up our personal time, our vacations, and our weekends on all the quest to keep up. Ultimately, we need a fundamentally new approach to the problem.According to McKinsey, 28 hours of every work week are spent on sorting emails and finding the information needed to do our job.

 

The question remains: How do we get workers to an even higher level productivity? I elaborate on the answer in this deck.


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To get this presentation on demand, you can access the recording here.

 

Have you implemented social business software? What changes have you experienced in the way you work?

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