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59 Posts authored by: deirdrewalsh

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Right now, there are 431 LinkedIn job listings for “community managers,” including the opening that I posted last week.

 

As I scoured through my hiring competition today, I felt my Irish rage starting to bubble up to the surface.  You see, I’m passionate about treating community management as a true profession; yet, it’s clear by the job descriptions online that many organizations still don’t “get it.”

 

The solution is simple. As a profession, we need to develop relevant terminology and career paths to explain the variety of community management positions in terms of experience level, salary, qualifications, and responsibilities.


Day-to-day, the responsibilities of community managers differ greatly based on their level.  Pulling from my inner video game nerd, I've created the following examples below:

 

 

1. Apprentice (entry-level): meet-and-greet new members, moderate conversations, approve membership requests, facilitate networking, manage SPAM, monitor site activity, enforce policies

2. Journeyman (specialist): create content, measure and report metrics, build relationships with advocates, reward positive behaviors, recruit members, research trends

3. Grandmaster (expert): optimize platforms, manage place owners, create internal trainings, host community events and programs, develop policies

4. Promethean (master): integrate community cross-functionally, provide strategic direction, manage resources and budget, represent the community internally, coach executives, determine road-map

 

The important thing is that all of these roles are working towards one common, visible, set of measurable objectives.


When I took on my first community manager role in 2006, I had one focus: to build quality relationships between the brand and its' advocates.  Now, community has touch points across the buyer journey, customer life-cycle, and employee career path.  It's key that we give this role and all social responsibilities the respect they deserve.

 

I’m curious to hear from you!  Share your take on the different roles and levels of community management in the comments below.

 

P.S. If you're interested in hiring a community manager, Libby Taylor wrote a post on How to write a Community Manager job description.

Screen Shot 2014-06-13 at 4.58.48 PM.pngI'm no stranger to the soccer field. My dad, whose college nickname was Elep (Pele backwards), spent many weekends teaching me the sport and cheering me on at games. While it has been many years since I've played, I’m still able to take the lessons learned on the grass and apply them to my role as a social strategist.

 

In honor of The World Cup kickoff and Father's Day, I've created this list of the top nine social lessons learned from soccer.

 

1. Master the Fundamentals

Just like players need to understand how to dribble, pass, and shoot, community managers must develop a core set of skills.  These talents include content creation, project management, and relationship building. Once you master these competences, you can move on to advanced techniques like gamification, business analytics, and platform optimization.

 

2. Listen to Your Coach

A strategic, passionate coach is a key to winning. Community managers must also have an executive sponsor who is vested in the success of the team. This leader authorizes funding and resources, approves key policies, and champions the success of the program among the e-staff. Most importantly, the executive sponsor has the strength to empower cultural change.

 

3. Have a Game Plan

In sports, every game plan is unique. Similarly, each roadmap to online community success varies. That’s because businesses use communities to accomplish a wide range of goals, such as customer support, strategic alignment, partner relationships, etc. Despite the variety, community managers must have a well-documented plan with measurable objectives, strategic use cases and technical features prioritized on potential impact to the business and ability to execute.

 

4. Be 100% Committed

Good soccer players are dedicated 24/7.  They practice, watch what they eat, and live and breathe the game. The same applies to social professionals.  It’s an “always on” job. There are no customer service timeouts or Twitter rainouts. When conversations spike or news breaks, the community manager has to be available.

 

5. Play with Passion

As with anything in life, you are more successful if you’re passionate. Luckily with both soccer and social that zeal comes naturally.

 

6. Keep a Level Head

Just like soccer opponents try to slide tackle you, online communities are full of strikes on the brand. It’s crucial for community managers to help alleviate tense situations and not fuel them.

 

7. Find Strength in Your Team

Many of the world’s leading soccer scorers have contributed their success to the pinpoint passing skills of their teammates. Likewise, good community managers rely on strong communication and collaboration with individuals across the organization. Everyone from legal to marketing has a position to play.

 

8. Appreciate Your Fans

Every soccer team has a set of rabid fans, but so do strong online communities. That’s because these online networks are more than just modern communication vehicles. They are made up of people who have a shared passion and shared “why.” Renowned community managers put their fans first; empowering, amplifying and rewarding them.

 

9. Celebrate Your Gooooaaaalllls!

In both soccer and social, numbers matter. Nothing is more rewarding then winning!

 

From kids playing in the streets of St. Louis to professionals duking it out in Brazil, soccer touches so many lives.  In the same light, so does social. I’ve watched as the role of community manager has evolved from something delegated to the intern into a respected profession sought out by the world’s most powerful brands. No matter where you fall on the spectrum of either, know that you are part of something big.

 

If you like this post, feel free to download the related SlideShare presentation, "Top 9 Social Lessons Learned from Soccer."

Disclaimer: I'm NOT a security expert; however, for the last month, I've been geeking out about the topic. Personally, the term "security" drums up the same level of excitement "social" did in 2006.


iStock_000024893774Small.jpgAs you may have seen in my post From Google to Gaga: The Top 9 Takeaways from SXSW 2014, the biggest breakthrough in tech this year wasn’t a new startup. It was the subject of privacy.  It started when Wikileaks founder Julian Assange Skped from an Ecuadorian embassy in London with more than 3,500 conference attendees.  At first, it seemed like a scene from a sci-fi movie with rhetoric from the latest conspiracy theorists. 

 

But then, Assange began sharing his point-of-view on the “military occupation of the Internet” and the ability for a few technology companies to capture massive amounts of information, creating a “surveillance nightmare.”  I left the session wanting to setup a Zuck vs. Assange debate and questioning the “share, share, share” mantra I’ve been preaching since I took my first social job in 2006. 

 

I continued to explore this topic. I went to sessions about Secret, a new app that allows users to “speak freely;” Darknet, a new kind of Internet where people can conceal their online behavior; and BitCoin, which enables anonymous payments using peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority or bank.

 

I started having flashbacks of my childhood, when I spent hours in Prodigy chatrooms creating fictional characters. I began to worry that as a technology community were going backwards.

 

Then, I came to realization that it’s about contextual privacy.  In our world of “connected things,” sensors are prolific.  They collect data about everything from location to heart rate. While I can’t help but geek out about the opportunity to use these new technologies, I must now UNDERSTAND what, when, where and why my information is being collected, analyzed, and shared.   As a good corporate marketer, I’m also on the mission to balance organizational needs with consumer desires.

 

Fatemeh Khatibloo, senior analyst at Forrester, put it this way, “context enables control, choice, and respect by putting guardrails around: data access and collection; data use; and data sharing.”

 

Additionally, she noted that contextual privacy addresses five questions:

  • Temporal: When can I collect info about and when can I use it?
  • Spatial: Where can I use data about you?
  • Functional: How can I collect and use data about you?
  • Identity: What persona are you when I interact with you?
  • Social: With whom can I share information about you?

 

Before I grant another app access to my Facebook page, I want to answer the questions above about the service.

 

Finally, in one of the highest attended sessions, Edward Snowden, who is famous for disclosing thousands of classified documents that revealed the operational details of global surveillance programs run by key governments, called on the technology community to build products that protect the right to privacy through the use of strong encryption technology.

 

I'm excited and proud to work for a social technology company that truly values user security and data.  Millions of users across the private and public sectors depend on Jive every day to keep their information safe and drive mission-critical business processes. That’s why we’ve taken a no-compromises approach to security, privacy and availability that combines best-of-breed technology, a highly trained and experienced staff, adherence to the strictest standards in the industry, and the flexibility to meet diverse requirements.

Many have you been asking When will the Jive Community upgrade to version 7?  Well, I'm happy to announce that day has come.   We

iStock_000003041480Small.jpgare now on the latest and greatest version of JiveX. 

 

Here are the 7 new features I'm most excited to share with you!

Social Sharing: Easily share your favorite Jive Community content on social media sites.

Enhanced Profiles: List your expertise and endorse your contacts.

Impact Metrics: See not only who has viewed your blog posts and documents, but who has referred them to others.

Search Weighting: Get more accurate results from a streamlined UX and new "smart search" algorithms.

Structured Outcomes: Mark content for action, or find final and official documentation.

Place Templates: Use pre-configured place templates designed for common use cases.

Enhanced iOS Native App: Create content, search for expertise, and interact via your custom streams. 

 

For a full list of all the enhancements, watch The specified item was not found..

 

 

P.S. This blog post was created by using the communications template from The specified item was not found. Cheers to drinking our own champagne!

 

P.S.S. Visit Behind-the-Scenes: Upgrade the Jive Community to 7 for inside look on the process.

 

What's your favorite new feature in JiveX 7? Also, if you have The specified item was not found. or see issues report them in the The specified item was not found. space.  Thanks!

6a012876c6c7fb970c017d3cfc82f1970c.gifI know most of you reading that title are saying, "Duh;" however, it's an important reminder.

 

As someone who has managed corporate social media channels for the last NINE years (yes, I started with a corporate MySpace page), I often get wrapped up in the business goals and numbers surrounding social:

* How many fans and followers do we have?

* How many net new names are we getting from our efforts?

* How many clicks to the website did social deliver?

 

While all of those are important, I got an email today that made me sit back and reflect. First I thought, "Why am I getting an email? Everyone should message me in the community."  Then, I put my gialyons-esque rant aside and got excited.  The simple note made me remember why I created my first social marketing program in 2006.  I wanted to have a true connection in real-time with my audience.

 

You see, I started off in Public Relations.  I graduated with a B.S. in P.R. No joke! Then, I spent years ghostwriting for state and local politicians, phone pitching the media on behalf of companies like HP, and leading crisis communications drills for large energy companies. While all of these things were exciting, I wanted a more direct relationship with the "public."  The emerging social channels gave me that.

 

The social media landscape, however, changed in the last few years.

  • There are only a few key social media sites, which are driven by data collection and ad dollars.
  • There is more noise, spam, and negativity posted than ever before.
  • There are a 8,224,925 people claiming to be social media experts on LinkedIn (myself included).

 

Why do I bring this up? Because I want Jive customers and employees to remember the best parts of being a company that "gets" social marketing.  We have to use social to build connections with customers, partners, employees, and prospects; share interesting information; and just be f'in cool. We also have to know that the social world is complex and sometimes nothing beats a face-to-face meetup.

 

So, I want to thank the folks internally at Jive and Rona Fouche at PWC for sharing the note below.  It made my day.

There was a power outage in the Phoenix Data Center and Rona Fouche from PwC said she first heard about it on Facebook by following Jive.

 

IMHO, social marketing is about truly about sharing the right information to the right people at the right time!

 

How have you seen social marketing evolve?  Share your story in the comments below.

iStock_000028641964Large.jpgOn March 10, I celebrated my 7th anniversary with my first social media darling, Twitter.  In fact, according to Twopcharts, that's 99.9 percent longer than all other Twitter users.


While we've had our ups and downs over the years, I still find Twitter to be a valuable social platform. Specifically (and measurably), for Jive, it's one of the most effective ways to share information about industry news, congratulate our customers, and connect in real-time during important events.


Luckily, I'm not the only one that sees value in this platform. Recently, CEOWorld Magazine named Jive CMO Elisa Steele one of the "Top Chief Marketing Officers You Should Follow on Twitter."


In light of this recognition, I did an informal interview with @elisasteele and gave her one rule: answer all my questions in 140 characters or less!


How long have you been on Twitter?

Started in 2009. Now it's part of my #workstyle.

 

What made you join?

Curiosity. Wanted to see the stories people were sharing. Had no intention of telling my own!

 

What made you get active?

Discovered @Twitter is a great platform to share what I love, learn from others and build relationships.

 

What are the subjects of your tweets?

#Moments #Work #Life #Whatever

 

You can continue this conversation with Elisa and me in the comments below or on Twitter at @elisasteele and @deirdrewalsh.

2014 marks my 16th year attending the SXSW Interactive, Film and Music conference.  Throughout the years, I’ve been part of some historic tech moments.  I blogged alongside Scoble in 2006…literally, I elbowed him by accident.  I joined the Twitter explosion in 2007.  I sat in the front row for Zuckerburg’s keynote in 2008. While memories like these standout, this year’s event was the most holistically thought-provoking.  I left re-energized and inspired by new ideas, connections and passions.

 

Below are nine trends from SXSW that have motivated me to innovate.  Also, feel free to download this SlideShare presentation for the highlights!

 

1. Privacy

Untitled design (10).pngThe biggest breakthrough this year wasn’t a new startup - it was the subject of privacy.   Speakers like Julian Assange, founder of Wikileaks; Edward Snowden, an NSA whistleblower; and Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist at the American Civil Liberties Union; gave mind-blowing presentations about data security and government surveillance. Beyond the center stage, people were buzzing about Secret, a new app that allows users to “speak freely;” Darknet, a new kind of Internet where people can conceal their online behavior; BitCoin, which enables anonymous payments with no central bank; and Ghostery, which looks for third-party page elements (or "trackers") on the web pages you visit and notifies you if they are present.  Even with all of this news, we are just starting to scratch the surface of this important topic.

 

2. Wearables and Printables

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While software enthusiasts preached privacy, the hardware gurus pushed sensors, wearable gadgets, and 3D printers. Google exec Sundar Pichai announced the company’s plan to release an Android-based SDK for wearable devices. In addition, several SXSW attendees demoed the potential to use new technologies.  I saw everything from a Twitter-powered, 3D printer that allows you to create your own Oreo flavor to smart medicine bottles that will send you a text message if you miss a dose. 

 


3. Legislation

Untitled design (13).pngFrom digital lobbying to patent reform to the power of the online “unruly mob,” SXSW made it clear that entrepreneurs and elected officials want to cooperate to modernize US legislation and government.  A new film by Brian Knappenberger called “The Internet’s Own Boy premiered at SXSW and shined light on outdated technology laws. This Kickstarter documentary follows programming pioneer Aaron Swartz from his involvement in RSS and Reddit to the tragic consequences following his hacking stunt at MIT. This film not only celebrates the life of an online visionary, but also inspires heated discussion about online access to information and the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.  It’s a must-watch film for anyone in tech!

 


4. Data

Copy of  Copy of  Copy of  Untitled design   .pngYou couldn’t turn a corner this year without hearing someone talk about “small data” or “big data.” Lots of smart marketers showcased how they’re using information for research, personalized news delivery, and location-based incentives. The best session I went to on the topic came from the energetic Founder of Kiip, Brian Wong. His mission is to serendipitously reward people for everyday moments like running, playing games, and listening to music. For example, if your mobile fitness app detects you’ve just beat your all-time running record, a third-party consumer company could send you a coupon for a free sports drink.  Beyond entertainment, Wong showed that people want to be rewarded for completing a task on their to-do-list. Sounds like a new feature idea for Producteev!

 

5. Experiences

2.pngThe one thing SXSW does better than any other event is provide a platform for unique experience creation.  From small app companies to corporate giants, the most successful organizations focused on manifesting shared experiences - not pushing messages. (Hello, bacon-scented alarm clock!) In all seriousness - it’s time to get smart about our smart devices.  Soon, your tablet, fitness tracker, and refrigerator will all be connected. Brands must think beyond how to serve up a specific marketing campaign.  Instead, they must start focusing on how to create daily, customized experiences across connected devices and IRL!

 

6. Economy

Copy of  Copy of  Copy of  Untitled design    (1).pngFrom Uber cars to Airbnb rooms, most SXSW attendees participated in some form of the sharing/collaborative economy.  If you aren’t familiar with this latest buzz phrase, you soon will be.  According to Crowd Companies exec Jeremiah Owyang, “it’s a powerful movement in which people are getting goods and services from each other” rather than buying from big brands.

 


7. Work

1.pngYes, people talk about work at SXSW. In the session “Workhacking Away from ‘Business As Usual,'" strategist Ayelet Baron and Forbes Blogger Rawn Shah led a conversation about modern work. They painted a beautiful picture of  “café people” moving from:

- Work-life to life-work balance

- Function-based jobs to project-based work

- Competing for market share to creating new markets

They also made bold statements, such as "change management will die because it will happen too quickly", and "retirement will be a thing of the past." While I’m not ready to “divorce my job,” I was truly inspired by their passion, knowledge and predictions.


8. Community

Copy of  Copy of  Untitled design   (2).pngCommunity and social media got plenty of airtime at SXSW.  Jive intern paul.vinelli made several recommendations based on his experience studying the What.CD online music community. Some of my favorite takeaways included the following:

- Backscratching and praise leads to strong relationships.

- Individuals should be accountable for whom they bring into communities.  If you invite someone in who breaches the guidelines, both you and the violator can be penalized.

- Members must main a strong ratio of contribution to consumption - say goodbye 90:9:1!

- Community membership is in many ways its own reward.

 

 

9. Passion

Copy of  Copy of  Untitled design   (1).pngOut of the hundreds of people I listened to during the week, none exhibited more passion than pop-star Lady Gaga. My favorite quote from her Friday morning keynote is "at the end of the day, nobody's going to remember what you tweeted when you die. No one's going to remember your Web content. What's going to be remembered is those magical moments you have helped create.”

 

Did you attend SXSW?  If so, what did I miss? Share you favorite moment in the comment section below.

Screen Shot 2013-12-30 at 9.54.42 AM.pngThe social team would like to thank everyone who contributed content or engaged with content in the Jive Community in 2013. We hope the Jive Community was and will continue to be a place you turn to for insights and to have intelligent conversations about your social business endeavors. As we close the 2013 folder and start one for 2014 we're celebrating the top 10 blog posts based on engagement within the Jive Community. Enjoy them if you missed them the first time around!

 

10. tara.panu : Transforming Company Culture Through Social Business

 

9. Melissa Barker : How a Social Intranet Transformed Thomson Reuters' Workforce

 

8. Claire Flanagan : Community Management Fundamentals Training Starts Dec 19

 

7. Ryan Rutan : Celebrate Community Manager Appreciation Day

 

6. gialyons : The Problem with Traditional Intranets

 

5. elizabeth.brigham : 8 Concrete Steps You Can Take To Becoming Truly Customer Centric

 

4. elizabeth.brigham : The Tactical Truth about Content Marketing

 

3. gialyons : Why Your Intranet Should be Seamlessly Social

 

2. Sean Winter : Jive's Response to "Employees don't like their social intranets, study says"

 

And the number one piece of content in the Jive Community in 2013 is...

 

 

1. elizabeth.brigham : Moving From Social Media to Social Business

 

The social team is very excited to see what 2014 brings!

 

What were your favorite and most enlightening pieces of content in the Jive Community in 2013?

Screen+Shot+2013-10-08+at+6.47.22+PM.png

Today, I'm thrilled to announce that Max Calderon has become Jive's new community manager!

 

In just 18 months as a Jiver, he has

   * helped onboard more than 100 new employees

   * created and managed spaces and groups for sales, partners, and customers

   * edited and published tons of internal training videos

   * and managed the company's own usage of Jive Present and Jive Present for Partners

 

Moving forward, Max will be taking over for the legendary Ryan Rutan and building relationships with each of you.

 

Specifically, I've tasked him with the job of creating communities that showcase the true power of Jive Software and inspire engagement; leading the worldwide user group program; sharing regular product tips and tricks; and measurably improving KPIs around areas like brand awareness, customer communications, and engagement. No pressure!  

 

To help you get to know Max, I did a brief Q&A with him, and he also posted this video introduction: New Community Manager?!

 

Q. What's your main focus going to be as the new community manager?

A. I'm focused representing and engaging the community. I'll do my best to connect experts with those asking questions, and personally assist when I can. That said - I don't know everything! Please be patient, especially since I'm not a developer. Unlike Ryan, I can't fix code, but I know some brilliant peoplewho can help.

 

Q. What most excites you about this position?

A. I really, really love learning and getting to know people. I can't wait to get engaged and help out.

 

Q. Beside's what you've mentioned in your video, what are 3 things you want people to know about you?

A. 1. I'm a huge fan and power-user of mobile technologies (Anuj Verma and team have to suffer me every day). 2) I nerd out about our industry, where different technologies sit relative to others and their niches in the market. 3. Heads up for lots of questions. I ask a lot of questions.

 

Join me in congratulating this self-proclaimed, "drummer, skater, gamer, nutrition/fitness/technology geek, foodie, outdoor fanatic, and animal lover."  I couldn't be happier that he is joining my team and that our entire community will now get to experience his passion for all things Jive. 

 

This year's JiveWorld365 keynotes were filled with mind-blowing entertainment, social business case studies, and product announcements.  In case you weren't able to join us OR you want to re-live the magic, we are posting the recordings.  Personally, I can't wait to re-watch the Dr. Eddie Obeng video over and over and over again!

 

Screen Shot 2013-10-24 at 4.28.43 PM.pngDSC05974.JPGScreen Shot 2013-10-24 at 4.30.55 PM.pngScreen Shot 2013-10-24 at 4.30.39 PM.pngScreen Shot 2013-10-24 at 4.30.07 PM.pngScreen Shot 2013-10-24 at 4.29.52 PM.png

 

Click to view the keynotes again.

 

The social team will also be loading all of the session videos into the private The specified item was not found. group over the next few weeks. We will also be releasing a new video every week on the public JiveWorld365 space for community members that couldn't make the big show.

 

Comment below with your favorite JiveWorld365 main stage moment.

Today marks the 5th anniversary of JiveWorld, and I'm happy to sport the digital badge of having been to every one!

 

I've seen a lot of amazing things at this conference over the years; however, I've never been more proud to be part of the event as I was today.  I got to lead this year's Social Business Boot Camp with Frank Pathyil.  This unique day-long session brings together social newbies with experienced veterans to have an open, honest conversation. This year, there were no slides, no product demos, no boring speakers.  Just pure social conversation.

 

Since I'm a social junkie, I thought the best way to recap today's event through social content.


Screen Shot 2013-10-22 at 4.27.52 PM.png



As you can see, it was a day of debate, fun, and most important, best practice sharing.  To continue the conversation with other attendees or panelists, join the JiveWorld365 group.

iStock_000001044520Small.jpgI have been fortunate enough to attend EVERY JiveWorld either as a customer or an employee. There is nothing like it! After each event, I leave feeling energized, inspired and empowered.  I wish every Jive customer, partner and fan could join me in Vegas next week.  Since that's not possible, I would like to bring a bit of the excitement to the community members stuck at home. 


As a thank-you gift to you for being the best community on the planet, Jive is going to be broadcasting the JiveWorld13 keynotes live


You will be able to hear amazing presentations from speakers like Tony.Zingale, CEO of Jive; oudi.antebi, SVP of Product Management at Jive; Krissy Espindola, T-Mobile's Director of Social Customer Support; and HK Dunston, Thomson Reuter's VP of Digital Communications.


I got a sneak peek into the main-stage rehearsal and know you're in for a treat.  We are going to be featuring transformational customer stories, deep dives into Jive's new product features, and insight into the future of Social Business.


The sessions will be at 8:30 am PST on 10/23 and 10/24.  Reserve your spot!


In addition to the live broadcasts, there are other ways to follow the action from your desk:

  • Read the JiveWorld365 and Jive Talks blogs for in-depth coverage live from the show.
  • Follow @JiveWorld for highlights of everything from customer sessions to parties.
  • Subscribe to our YouTube channel for exclusive product and customer videos.
  • What happens in Vegas stays on Jive's Instagram. We will have roaming photographers to bring you the best (and funniest) situations from the conference.
  • We'll also be broadcasting the big stuff on Facebook, Google + and LinkedIn, if you prefer those networks.

 

Look forward to connecting with you online next week!

Screen Shot 2013-09-12 at 2.29.11 PM.png

 

Answer: That Jive Software is Awesome!


No, I'm not referencing internet superstar and creator of The Fox Ylvis.  We had someone even better onsite at Jive headquarters in Palo Alto today.


Liz Claman from Fox Business!


Jive hosted the fantastic crew of the segment 3 Days in the Valley, which annually profiles the best technology companies in the Bay Area. Each day during the event, Liz sets up a mobile studio at a different location and invites notaries to share their industry insights.


Since The Valley is "dripping with optimism, ideas, and innovation," it's no surprise that Jive was featured alongside other great organizations like Flipboard, Intel, Glyde, and Facebook.


We were proud to show off our strong leadership, fun culture, and impactful vision.


Specifically, check out the following videos:

Jive Software Hosts Fox Business News: 3 Days in the Valley - YouTube

Jive and Fox Business Host GitHub CEO Tom Preston-Werner - YouTube

Fox Business Talks with Members of Jive's Board - YouTube


To view all coverage from the day, tune into Jive's YouTube Channel or check out our Instagram stream.

Do you know anyone at your company that you think is a genius? Each company has their own variety of geniuses and it’s important that their brainpower is unleashed in order to achieve business goals. Companies must engage employees to fuel innovation through the organization.

 

A social intranet acts as a hub for enterprise collaboration and communication that engages and informs employees. This allows silos to break down and the best thinking rises to the top. Innovative cultures are uncovered and energized through the functions of a social intranet.

 

This SlideShare will teach you how to boost your company's brainpower by:

  1. Connecting your people
  2. Finding and recognizing your Einsteins
  3. Brainstorming more effectively
  4. Capturing the ‘light bulb’ moments
  5. Taking action on good ideas quickly

 

Screen Shot 2014-08-04 at 3.28.32 PM.png

 

If your company has uncovered tactics that help shed light on bright ideas submit them to be included in our eBook. Bonus: you'll receive a complimentary white paper with your submission!

After reading Unlock Six Secrets to Social Success you will have the necessary knowledge for your organization to realize its social potential. To implement these 6 steps can take a lot of time and resources to think through and set up. We wanted to help you on this journey.

We’ve provided you with a Business Guide to Social Success Checklist to jump-start this process.

 

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Are you utilizing tactics that are not on this checklist? Share them below!

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