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Jive Talks

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mnevill

Business 2.0 with Jive

Posted by mnevill Champion Aug 15, 2014

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Do you remember when the Internet was just taking off?  If you could find what you were looking for you would bookmark the site, print it out, AND download a local copy just to make sure you would have it again.  It was not really easy for anyone to share knowledge or ask and answer questions.  Fast forward many years later and all the sudden you could publish a website, a video, or collaborate with anyone around the world to create useful consumable content.  Google was born along the way to replace Infoseek, Altavista, and

Logo_2013_Google.pngeverything else to become the way to find anything anywhere instantly.  Google replaced all our bookmarks and personal files and we liked it that way. 

 

Unfortunately today our businesses are stuck in the same trap that the Internet started out in.  We have information and content, but it is stuck in file folders and Outlook PST files, and you can’t find them not to mention easily share them to help others.  The good news is Jive came along and became the Google for our businesses.  Now there is an easy way to ask and answer questions, share documents, and much more.  Just like Google, with Jive you can find everything you need instantly.  The Internet evolved, why can’t our businesses?  If you share it, they will find it with Jive.

Meet Doug MacKay of Critical Mass. He's inspired other members of the Jive Community with his enthusiasm and knowledge and was suggested for this interview by our first interviewee, Rachel Duran. I think that Doug has the workstyle question SOLVED, folks. And if you have any doubts, check out the photo below which shows where he was working from last week! I don't want to spoil it though, so let's start at the beginning.


How I Work - Doug Small image.jpg


Libby: Where do you work (location, in the office, remotely, etc.):

Doug: I'm working at the headquarters of Critical Mass, a global marketing agency, in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Mostly I work in the office but it seems lately that I'm working all the time: at home and mobile. The interesting thing is that the idea of work is changing. While it's pervasive, the load sometimes diminishes to the point where I can enjoy the outdoors AND keep working.

 

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   The ultimate office view.

 

LT: So, what's your current gig?

Doug: I'm currently playing as the Director of Information Systems at Critical Mass, which is a lot of fun as I get to solve global issues for all of our employees and valued clients. I get to do everything from forming our #UserCentricIT strategy and budgeting to personal on-boarding training for new employees.

 

LT: How do you use Jive at work (internal, external, etc)?

Doug: We've been living Jive internally now for almost 4 years. It's been a wild ride of successes. We're now piloting externally accessible spaces and Box integrations so we're extending our hub.

 

LT: Mac or PC (or something else)?

Doug: As an agency we're all over the place! Mostly a Mac shop for creatives but we do everything so we have PCs as well. Of course, there's always something else but I won't bore you with Solaris and Linux!

 

LT: How about your mobile device?

Doug: I just switched over from my old iPhone4S to a brand-spanking-new rockin' HTC One M8! Wicked! I really loved my iPhone, but I'm amazed with my HTC. Just wish it would work with iPhoto.

 

LT: If you had to pick one word, how would you best describe how you work?

Doug: Focused. Our systems are mission critical so that dictates my world.

 

LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?

Doug: Oh no. Now you'll know how geeky I can be. Yeeesh! Well, Apache Directory Studio, Chrome, OneLogin, Jive, BoxSync, Terminal, TextMate, and Adium. I find Chrome just works better, you know?  Easier, faster and simple. With all of these tools there's a lot of complexity so I need a simple clean work to wield the tools.

 

LT: Your tech-geekiness doesn't scare me! Let's keep going... Besides your phone and computer, do you have a favorite gadget?

Doug: Well, it's summertime so my favorite gadget is my BBQ!

LT: And that's not a tech gadget at all!

 

LT: What's your favorite to-do list manager?

Doug: Now we're getting personal. I'm old-school so I use an stack of paper. I write things down. Sure, I've got Notes and Reminders and Calendars but to-do's are easier to scratch off and pour coffee onto.

LT: I totally get it, I have to admit that I'm a fan of the old-fashioned notebook. Go figure.

 

LT: I already saw your vacation office from the photo, so what's your daily workspace like?

Doug: It's rather purposeful. We're entirely digital here and move around a lot, so culturally our desks aren't expressions of individuality. It takes too long to clean up!  Mostly I have a screen to do all my work and a phone (or two) to reach out.

 

LT: What do you listen to while you work?

Doug: We're nimble and responsive here. There's music playing all the time but it's Songza! Otherwise we're open concept and talk all the time. I only bring on the Katy Perry when I need to concentrate.

LT: That's hilarious.

 

LT: So what's your best time-saving trick?

Doug: Focus. I'm legendary here at focusing to the point of not hearing my co-workers. That's without headphones. It's kind of embarrassing, really.

 

LT: And how do you balance work and life?

Doug: I ensure that if anyone can work remotely it's got to be the IT team. After all, if we can't do it right for a digital agency then we're not doing our jobs. So that means I split my time between office and home. It keeps my family happy even though I might be on the deck with my laptop. I also make sure to silence my phone for non-work hours and only let emergency calls come through. It streamlines life.

 

LT: What's your sleep routine like?

Doug: LOL, I'm a Dad so I have the superhuman ability to sleep anywhere, at any time.  Gimme a sec...Zzzzzzzz....

LT: I am fairly sure that moms have the exact opposite superhuman ability of waking up at the slightest sound. I'm a little jealous.

 

LT: Almost done... Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?

Doug: Both. I think that INTJ's don't have to be always "I" but can move into the "E" given the right circumstances. I lean more "I". Maybe 11 out of 20...

 

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received (and from whom)?

Doug: Really two things: Do whatever you want, but make sure you're the best as you can be at it. And something I've learned over time as a parent: Treat everyone like they are your kids and they'll love you back.

 

LT: Fill in the blank.

Doug: I'd love to see John Schwiller answer these same questions.

 

To thank Doug MacKay for his responses to this interview, I've made him a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture his workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Facebook header photo-size in case he wants to highlight his workstyle there and can be popped into Twitter as a background image as well. Super handy!

Doug Mackay Workstyle.jpg

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Right now, there are 431 LinkedIn job listings for “community managers,” including the opening that I posted last week.

 

As I scoured through my hiring competition today, I felt my Irish rage starting to bubble up to the surface.  You see, I’m passionate about treating community management as a true profession; yet, it’s clear by the job descriptions online that many organizations still don’t “get it.”

 

The solution is simple. As a profession, we need to develop relevant terminology and career paths to explain the variety of community management positions in terms of experience level, salary, qualifications, and responsibilities.


Day-to-day, the responsibilities of community managers differ greatly based on their level.  Pulling from my inner video game nerd, I've created the following examples below:

 

 

1. Apprentice (entry-level): meet-and-greet new members, moderate conversations, approve membership requests, facilitate networking, manage SPAM, monitor site activity, enforce policies

2. Journeyman (specialist): create content, measure and report metrics, build relationships with advocates, reward positive behaviors, recruit members, research trends

3. Grandmaster (expert): optimize platforms, manage place owners, create internal trainings, host community events and programs, develop policies

4. Promethean (master): integrate community cross-functionally, provide strategic direction, manage resources and budget, represent the community internally, coach executives, determine road-map

 

The important thing is that all of these roles are working towards one common, visible, set of measurable objectives.


When I took on my first community manager role in 2006, I had one focus: to build quality relationships between the brand and its' advocates.  Now, community has touch points across the buyer journey, customer life-cycle, and employee career path.  It's key that we give this role and all social responsibilities the respect they deserve.

 

I’m curious to hear from you!  Share your take on the different roles and levels of community management in the comments below.

 

P.S. If you're interested in hiring a community manager, Libby Taylor wrote a post on How to write a Community Manager job description.

Technology by itself is not going to be enough to make a workforce more productive -- it requires a clear line of site to business value.

 

Let's start by looking at the state of business today: businesses have developed and implemented over-engineered, automated processes.  And in the quest to create productivity, we now have the 24 hr workday.

 

We need to figure out how to go on this "productivity" quest, but in a fundamentally different direction. Looking back at the last 60 years, we have been cranking 100% growth in productivity every two decades. The punchline is that we have now reached a point where it is just not working. There isn't an option not to be more productive. Industry opportunity and competition drive a treadmill dynamic that is always accelerating. We streamlined process and then over-engineered it. We automated as many things as we could. We even gave up our personal time, our vacations, and our weekends on all the quest to keep up. Ultimately, we need a fundamentally new approach to the problem.According to McKinsey, 28 hours of every work week are spent on sorting emails and finding the information needed to do our job.

 

The question remains: How do we get workers to an even higher level productivity? I elaborate on the answer in this deck.


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To get this presentation on demand, you can access the recording here.

 

Have you implemented social business software? What changes have you experienced in the way you work?

Will Rose has been in the Jive Community for four years now. In my mind, that makes him an expert here! I had to stalk him a little bit to give you a summary, since he and I have never worked together before this interview. Here's what I found.

 

How I Work - Will image.jpg

Will has been the enterprise community manager for T-mobile's external community which has around 60,000 users. His community, which serves T-mobile's customers, is on fire with content which reflects how hot mobile is in the world right now. How does Will manage it all? Find out by reading his interview below.

 

Libby: Where do you work (location, in the office, remotely, etc.)?

Will: I work for T-Mobile USA, the nation's 4th largest wireless service provider, and am based at our corporate headquarters in Bellevue, Washington.  Everything you've heard about Seattle weather is absolutely true!  9 months out of the year we're the most dedicated worker bees, but when that sun gods bless us, you'll likely find us on the lake.

 

LT: How would you describe your current job?

Will: I lead a team of technical wizards within the Knowledge Management organization which reports into Customer Service. We're something of a Shadow IT operation.  We do it all -- from requirements gathering and UI/UX design to development and deployment.  We take pride in saying "Yes!" when IT says "No".

 

LT: That's sounds pretty cool! How do you use Jive at work (internal, external, etc)?

Will: We've pretty much done it all (perhaps not all of it particularly well...) with Jive. With 8 Jive instances (7 hosted, 1 cloud), we have something for pretty much everyone. We have a more traditional Customer Support community (support.t-mobile.com) where we house both Support documentation and customer peer-to-peer discussions. And that's about where the 'traditional' use cases stop.  We have a community used primarily as a knowledge base for our front-line Customer Service (call center) and Sales (retail) representatives. We also have several communities which are more strictly 'locked down' and used as knowledge bases to support various 'partner brands' (see support.gosmartmobile.com) and retail partners (you know, like those kiosks you see in malls).  Seems weird to use a social software like Jive in a reduced or completely 'read-only' state, but we love how easy Jive has made it for us to customize the experience.

 

LT: What's your preference: Mac or PC (or something else)?

Will: Both? The Mac is my daily driver, but IT likes to remind me T-Mobile is a Windows shop. There aren't many folks at T-Mobile who use Macs... there are so few that  IT almost refuses to support them. To combat this, I started a Mac Users group in our community for us to connect and share workarounds. That VPN setup IT didn't know how to set up on a Mac? Documented! That cloud printing service that we were told would only work with a PC?  Documented!

 

LT: You really are a Shadow IT Hero! What mobile device do you use?

Will: iPhone 5s / iPad Air.  I used to be a hardcore Android user, flashing custom ROMs and whatnot, but I've given in completely to the will of Steve Jobs. The Apple ecosystem has me and I can't let it go.

 

LT: If I forced you to pick one word that best describes how you work, what would it be?

Will: "Maverick"

 

LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?

Will: Adobe Photoshop because we like to 'fake it til we make it'.

 

LT: Oh my gosh, me too. I can't live without PhotoShop! I'm an HTML widget queen. I love me some image maps.

 

LT: Besides your phone and computer, do you have a favorite gadget?

Will: My iPad. I haven't exactly gotten on the 'use my tablet for work' train yet, but it is great for playing games and surfing the ol' Interweb.

 

LT: What's your favorite to-do list manager?

Will: The sticky notes on my monitor.  If it aint there, it aint getting done!

 

LT: What you surround yourself with is important, what's your workspace like?

Will: Here, take a look!

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LT: Nice view! What's your best time-saving trick?

Will: If i saved any more time I think they'd question the need for my position!

 

LT: How do you balance work and life?

Will: I come in late and leave early. Seriously. I have a two-year old and try to maximize my time with him vs. maximizing the time the daycare has with him. That might mean I get to the office around 9 and try to start wrapping things up around 4. After he goes to bed though I pull the laptop back out and finish anything up I didn't get to or simply get a jump on the next day.

 

LT: That's exactly what I did when my kids were still little. It really makes things work better at home.

 

LT: Nice view! What do you listen to while you work?

Will: I'm pretty eclectic when it comes to music (sorry country fans, you can check your twang at the door) so the playlist can vary from The Beatles to 2Pac, Adele to Skrillex.  I try not to go directly from 'poppin a cap' to 'rollin in the deep', but you never know what can happen when you hit Shuffle.

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  Here's what happens when I put 2Pac a little too close to Adele and then shake them up in Photoshop. Plus I found some delicious mash-ups for your enjoyment (warning Tupac's language is not for the faint of heart):

 

LT: Thanks for giving me a nice diversion looking for 2Pac/Tupac/Adele mashups!


LT: Next question, what's your sleep routine like?

Will: Not awesome. I try to get to sleep by midnight and I'm back up around 6:30.

 

LT: Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?

Will: I'm the most extroverted introvert you'll ever meet!  x2 after I have a beer... or two...

 

LT: Would that make it extroverted introvert x4? Sounds like fun.

 

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received (and from whom)?

Will: Seek first to understand, then to be understood. Thanks Stephen Covey! The '5 Habits of Highly Effective People' is a great book.  I have to be honest, I didn't go into it thinking much of these 'corporate self-help' books, but this one was worth the read!

 

LT: Fill in the blank in the sentence below...

Will: I'd love to see Dennis Pearce answer these same questions.


To thank Will Rose for his responses to this interview, I've made him a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture his workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Facebook header photo-size in case he wants to highlight his workstyle there and can be popped into Twitter as a background image as well. Super handy.

Will Rose Workstyle.jpg


Remember back when you were a child and you heard older kids talking about summer camp and how fun it was?

The canoe races, the horseback riding... making crafts, swimming in the lake and sleeping under the stars... and don't forget the s'mores! It all sounded like heaven to me.


That's how I feel about JiveWorld14.

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   S'mores at JiveWorld? I say YES.

 

I've heard the stories about JiveWorld, wondered at the legends... Seen pictures that looked like a technicolor nightclub on steroids. Just like summer camp, I've always wanted to attend but never could get the trip approved.

 

The funny thing is, now that I'm working at Jive, I'm helping to plan JiveWorld14!

 

I'm in charge of Social Business Boot Camp, the day-long pre-conference training before JiveWorld begins. It's an appropriate assignment considering that Boot Camp is aimed at people new to Jive (either as prospects or new customers). So as far as the topics we are covering, I feel right at home.

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We're planning a lot of fun speakers and activities for our boot campers, so if you plan on attending JiveWorld14, be sure to indicate that you want to attend Boot Camp as well. It's part of the JiveWorld price of admission (in other words, it's FREE!).

 

When is Boot Camp?

 

Date: Tuesday, October 21 – 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM (BTW: JiveWorld's main sessions are Wednesday, October 22 - Thursday, October 23)

Where: The Cosmopolitan, Las Vegas


Why Attend?

 

  •     Hear real-world stories of social business success.
  •     Build the business case for launching social technologies at your organization.
  •     Understand how to win over executives, IT, legal, HR, business units and end users.
  •     Network with Jive customers and social business strategists who’ve been in your shoes.

 

By the way, if you are planning on attending JiveWorld14, the early bird registration ends July 31st! That's just days away, people! You better get on it!

 

So pack up your back pack, rinse out your canteen, bring your bug spray - then meet me at Boot Camp!

 

Register right now, in fact.

 

Just click the button below, you know you want to.

 

Want to see what happens at JiveWorld? You can watch video from last year's event at JiveWorld365!

Businesses; jobs and the workplaces are changing faster than ever before. Skills which were considered 'hot' until yesterday are no longer considered even special today. With the change in business due to competition and customers expectations soaring high; today the employees are evaluated on many additional parameters they aren’t even aware of. Fact is employees are constantly being observed to check if they have the critical yet unwritten 'virtues' to fit into the new roles & responsibilities needed for the organizations present success and future growth.

Follows 10... Oh! OK 9 signs that your career is getting 'killed' silently and you are gradually loosing the plot at the workplace without your knowledge.

 

1.If you are considered a Rambo…a one man army

You have won many awards in the past for great performance and have the personal ability to steer any project to success. You have always been a successful lone warrior. You never need anyone’s help and asking for help is a big embarrassment for you.
But you know; today’s work is too complex to be handled with just 'personal heroism'. Today’s businesses need 'collective' efforts & intelligence to succeed. You need to collaborate with your peers; customers & partners every time. Today your success in the organization would depend more on how connected; collaborative & 'social' you are and less on how 'capable' you are as an individual.

 

2. If you are always worried about your work-life balance

Your idea of work-life balance is a 9 to 5 job. You haven’t yet discovered that there is nothing like work life balance. Actually life & work are integral to each other. You cannot separate them. You have to build a 'synergy' to do justice to both your personal and work lives. They cannot be delimited by time. Fact of the matter is you could never win doing the 'balancing act'. You have to find ways how both gel well into a holistically rewarding experience for you.

3. If you and your desktop are inseparable

You have always loved your desktop computer. After all; it stores all software and documents you need for your work. You become uncomfortable if someone wants you to work on a 'cloud' application from a different computer. Where ever you are; you can start your work only when you are back at your desktop.

4. If for you work means phone calls; emails & face-to-face meetings

Your idea of work is to read/send emails; answer phone calls and if both don’t work have face to face meetings. You know these methods are big time wastes but you still continue with them. You are yet to catch up with the idea of using new communication methods like video chat; social collaboration & mobility at work. Remember, a meeting is an event where ‘minutes’ are taken and hours wasted. " A conference call = 1 person talking and 26 people continuing to do their email” says Dr. Eddie Obeng a well known business guru.

5. If you find downloading Apps on your phone and using them cumbersome

You have a gleaming smartphone in your pocket but that’s only to attend calls and send emails. You don’t search or download apps in it to make your work easy. You wonder why the millennials in your office often ask you ' Why do you do this manually. Don’t you have an app for it?’

6. If you often wonder why some people bother so much about 'virtual' badges; levels or points

For you the perfect incentive is only bonuses & cash awards. You are motivated only when you get a salary hike or a promotion. Winning online badges & points doesn’t make sense for you. You are not able to figure out why someone would strive for 'recognition' as an 'expert' without any monetary rewards.

7. If you keep new ideas too close to your chest

You keep your ideas to yourself waiting for the perfect time to unleash it before the senior most guys. You feel they might get 'stolen' by your colleagues if you share them on employee’s internal social network.

8. If you trust on your conventional wisdom only and not on ‘data’.

Old perceptions are fading fast and what we have always considered right is turning out to be big myths. Thanks to the massive data today people easily have access to. No doubt your intuition/gut feelings are important but they need the support of data insights too.

9. Last but not least; if you still aren’t convinced that it could happen in 2015.

Great that you are an optimist! Loosing the job doesn’t necessarily mean you would immediately stop getting the paychecks. But the process could start in any or all of the following ways:

a)You getting isolated within the team

b) You not being included in important projects

c) You being sent on forced sabbatical

d) You not taken to customer meets

e) Millennials stopping interactions with you

f) Your boss & senior management start ignoring you.

 

If there is evidence of above signs in your work it simply indicates that you are gradually loosing your battle at the workplace and it should be addressed urgently. It makes a lot of sense to get pumped up and be the change agent for your self.

Ryan Rutan needs no introduction, but I'm going to give him one anyway!

 

In the Jive Community, he has acted as the Community Manager, key app developer, and general rockstar Jiver. People flock to him to get his autograph at JiveWorld and his all-night hack-a-thons have changed lives (at least that's what the legends say). And while we won't go into his personal life here, I have proof that he is an overall amazing human being.

 

How I Work - Ryan image.jpg

    If Jive were a kingdom, Ryan would definitely be the crown prince.


Let's find out what a day-in-the-life of Ryan looks like below.

 

Libby Taylor: Hey Ryan, you've had a huge impact on the Jive Community. My endless thanks to you! Let's get down to business, we know you work for Jive, but where do you conduct your magic?

Ryan: I live (and work) in the greatest city in the world.  Austin, TX. Where technology instinctively flocks like the salmon of Capistrano!

 

LT: And what is your current gig (besides being amazing)?

Ryan: Currently I am Jive's Developer Evangelist, which allows me to work with some of the best customers, partners and prospects to talk about social business problems and how to build solutions using the Jive Platform.  #winning

 

LT: How do you use Jive at work (internal, external, etc)?

Ryan: The easiest answer I can give is the number: 118. That is the average number of tabs of Jive that I have open on my computer at home on any given day (for realz). Jive allows me to execute on work at a pace that rivals the speed at which I think. So how do I use Jive?  Ever-presently!

 

LT: I'm almost afraid to ask because I can only imagine your work space, what computer system do you use?

Ryan: Fully Loaded 3.4Ghz Quad-Core Ivy Bridge iMac with 3 x 27" Monitors. When I travel, I have to use my laptop, an iPad and iPhone in tandem to feel as though I'm not being 1/3 less productive.

 

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   I don't know, I think I see space for at least another monitor or maybe a few more devices. #multitasking


LT: I can almost answer this question myself by looking at your desk.. what is your current mobile device situation:

Ryan: It is no secret, I am a Mac addict.  I am currently rocking an iPhone 5s, and have plans to reintroduce a wrist watch to my arm when the iWatch is released.  A bit much?  Probably, but I'm OK with that. =)


LT: And don't forget your iPad too...


LT: What one word best describes your work style?

Ryan: Efficient. When it comes to work, I find that doing one thing at a time is boring. If I don't have multiple things in motion, I lose track of what's going on. Fun fact: I've set the high score on every Speed of Light machine I've ever played. =)


LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?

Ryan: First on the list is definitely multiple monitors. I don't care what people say, but square footage of monitor real-estate trumps any multitasking software. Next would definitely be a solid Terminal window implementation with transparent background, because sometimes you just need to see what's going in the background. When it comes to software, there's a tie for 3rd between the OS X's spotlight launcher (can't wait for Yosemite!!!!!) and Google Chrome, but to throw one more piece of hardware on the list ... it would have to be my split key natural keyboard(s) by Microsoft. (That last one is hard for me to say aloud, thank you for listening).


LT: Not to beat the tech topic into the ground but besides your phone, iPad, multiple screens and computer, what gadget can't you live without?

Ryan: That's pretty hard, but I think I would have to say my WiFi/Router, but a close second is my Apple TV.  I remember back in the day running coax cables for token ring networks, tripping over tangled cables and installing clunky network cards. Nowadays, I have to worry more about channel interference and what to name my WiFi hot spot so my neighbors think I'm cool. My neighbor has his named "FBI Surveillance Van" ... I'd love to get suggestions on how to top that!

 

LT: Maybe Jive Community members can add name suggestions for your WiFi hot spot in the comments below!

 

LT: You seem to get a lot done in a little time. What's your favorite to-do list manager?

Ryan: Hands down, it is Evernote. Usually my to-do's are so scattered, but Evernote makes it super simple for me to record notes via text, pictures or even sound ... and I can easily follow-up on said items and knock them off the list. Besides that, I would have to say my brain, as I tend to process and retain most of my to-do's there for a while before they make it to Evernote (and I like it that way).

 

LT: Although we've already seen a picture of it, would you like to comment on what it's like to work in your workspace?

Ryan: In any given day/week, my workspace goes from immaculate to cluttered, to stacked to unbalanced, to messy to just enough room, to time to push it all off into a box, to digging through the box, to putting things from the box in their right place and back to immaculate.  It's a vicious cycle!

 

LT: What's your best time-saving trick?

Ryan: Don't solely rely on asynchronous communication to get things done, like approvals. Most times, time spent waiting and tracking down people to get approvals on their own time wastes time and keeps things in the forefront longer than they need to be. Take the extra minute, track the person down (by IM, phone, carrier pigeon) and let them know that you are reaching out to them. If the person isn't there, find someone in the office that you know works on their team or sits near the person and ask them to let that person know you are looking for them. The time you save in back and forth missed connections adds up fast!

 

Ryan: Also, trust your instincts and don't second guess. Don't be afraid of being wrong or putting your thoughts out into the open for others to see and contribute. The more we share, the more we work better together!

 

LT: Besides the hum of all those monitors, what do you listen to while you work?

Ryan: It depends. If I'm doing creative writing, then I can't listen to music by my favorite artists; otherwise, I would bust out into song and rock the mouse like a microphone all too often.  So I tend to listen to disposable interchangeable upbeat modern artists during the day to keep my brain firing, and when I want to relax...I chillax to the Counting Crows!  (Side note: I've got back stage passes to meet them on July 30th, so that will be awesome.)

 

LT: What's your sleep routine like?

Ryan: Minimal. Plenty of time to sleep when you are dead. Prior to marriage and family life, I averaged about 4 hours of sleep a night, I'm up to a solid 6 now, but I only do so for the safety of others. =)

 

LT: I'm fairly sure I would die on 4 hours of sleep a night. Six would still be tough.

 

LT: Personality-wise, are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?

Ryan: I've been clinically tested as both an introvert and extrovert, and I have the sticker(s) to prove it!

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received?

Ryan: Ask big ... get big. There is no harm in going big on an ask, the worst that can happen is that they say no. Be confident and do not shy away from something you want, especially if you know that you are capable of putting in the work to achieve it.

 

LT: Thanks for a great interview, Ryan! Who would you like to be interviewed next?

Ryan: Weird Al Yankovic (the most versatile and talented musician of all-time)

 

weird al.jpg

  Yeah... sorry Ryan, interviewing Weird Al is just not going to happen. Fun idea though.

 

 

To thank Ryan Rutan for his responses to this interview, I've made him a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture his workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Twitter header photo-size in case he wants to highlight his workstyle there. I know it looks gigantic, but it'll look great once he pops it into Twitter and sizes it...

 

Ryan Rutan Workstyle.jpg

    If you would like to participate in the How I Work series and get a cool #workstyle graphic like the one above, just let me know!


I think all of our folks in the Developer group should see this too!

Ever wonder what it takes to succeed with online community strategy and operations?  Here are 56 lessons learned culled from 20 years of online community building experience.

 

  1. To succeed at online community building, your organization must be able to give members a reason to convene – online or offline.
  2. Take time to validate your community strategy with prospective members. They will likely help you make important adjustments to the plan.
  3. The sponsoring organization must create a balance of “gives” to members and “gets” from members – no community can be one-sided; every community is collaborative.
  4. Involve stakeholders across lines of business and the organization as a whole when determining what the community must accomplish.
  5. Create a vision statement that is clear, aspirational and achievable.
  6. Share the vision statement within the community so members know what to expect.
  7. Define your audience clearly – who the community intends to serve will dictate how you go about serving them.
  8. Create a 90-day operational plan for community; revise it every 90 days.
  9. The Big Idea: People come for content and stay for community.
  10. Start with an emphasis on institutional content, then plan the shift to organic (user generated) content.
  11. Get to know your industry influencers on and offline.
  12. Engage your industry influencers early and often.
  13. Bring legal into community planning before you launch.
  14. Make sure your organization’s social media policy is in effect and your people are trained on what it really means.
  15. Create clear KPIs for the community and socialize them well.
  16. Be sure community success measures are aligned with (at least!) 1 strategic goal of the organization.
  17. Don’t expect a miracle. Communities take time to grow.
  18. Communities can generate revenue with the right business model in place.
  19. Cost reductions can be a short-term win for a community, but long-term ROI is built on innovations, process improvements, increased customer satisfaction and R&D.
  20. Know your community’s business goals  before shopping for a software vendor. Otherwise you could be buying a boat when you need to cross the desert.
  21. Map your business requirements to the software offering’s strengths to enable the right choices.
  22. Don’t expect community software to meet your all your needs straight out of the box.
  23. Know the difference between B2B online community best practices and B2C best practices — they are different. Very different.
  24. Decide early which online community model you will adopt: public, gated or hybrid.
  25. If your organization is not good at customer engagement, an online community won’t solve the problem. In fact, it will make your flaws more visible. To everyone.
  26. Start with a beta group of friendlies before launching your community to the world.
  27. Hire skilled online community managers and treat them with professional respect.
  28. Don’t launch the community until you have an online community manager in place.
  29. If you don’t let staff speak directly to your biggest client in the offline world, don’t let them run the community.
  30. Member acquisition for an online community is not a marketing campaign.
  31. Prospective community members don’t respond well to highly-graphical invitations. They think it is marketing spam.
  32. Prepare a weekly or monthly newsletter – it will drive about 60% of your traffic in the first year.
  33. Outreach often to members to invite them into discussions. They are unlikely to come in on their own at first.
  34. Create an outreach database to log member interactions: who, when, why, what happened?
  35. Use the “three bears” model for member outreach: not too much, nor too little. Just right means testing, watching and responding  to member behavior, tenure and intimacy.
  36. Create an editorial calendar for the community. You need to know where content is coming from and when it is going online.
  37. Make sure you have low risk (e.g. polls), mid risk (comments, document sharing) and high risk (discussions, interviews) features in  the community.
  38. Think through the process impact of features and document workflows to ensure closed-loop cycles.
  39. Members who upload a photo in the profiles area are 7X more likely to post in the future.
  40. Establish a baseline for key measures before the community starts so you know when success happens.
  41. Develop an “inner circle” of select members who will form the core of the community and keep it growing over time.
  42. Ask your members’ opinion about topics that matter. They are smart and insightful and can help you steer the ship.
  43. Integrate the community operations into the lines of business.  Communities can help fuel conference attendance, support new product launches and identify early market trends.
  44. Share your findings strategically. If you spot a trend or a customer dissatisfaction issue brewing, let the business know.
  45. Keep your executives informed on community successes as well as challenges.
  46. Make every-day heroes out of your members – let them tell their story.
  47. Don’t use a community to sell to members.  They will be disappointed and will stop participating.
  48. Measure what matters. Your community will become what you measure — plan accordingly.
  49. Give your online community a “health check” every 6-9 months to ensure you are making progress on your chosen goals.
  50. When discussions are quiet, talk to yourself online. Eventually someone will empathize and join the conversation.
  51. Don’t take down posts you don’t agree with. Instead, engage in the conversation with transparency.
  52. Put a crisis management plan in place as well as a clear triage process. It will save you pain in the long run.
  53. Use the community to do research on topics that matter to members and your company. Everybody wins.
  54. Blend offline and online member engagement whenever possible.
  55. Even the busiest of members will participate if they find value in the community.
  56. Community is the epicenter of customer engagement.  Let your members know they are heard and respected.

Rachel Duran is no newcomer to community management. She's written some excellent blogs in the Jive Community including 5 Tips for Becoming an Expert in Your Community and also 5 Reasons Why An Internal Community May Not Be Right For You. She'll also be speaking at JiveWorld14 for a session called Connect the Dots: How RadioShack created viral internal engagement.

How I Work - Rachel image.jpg

    Rachel's got enthusiasm you can almost smell. Okay, maybe you can't smell it, but you sure can FEEL it.

 

Get the feeling for what it's like to be in Rachel's shoes by reading more below!

 

Libby Taylor: Let's start with the obvious, where do you work?
Rachel: I work for the RadioShack Corporation. RadioShack is an international electronics retailer with 4,500 company-operated stores in the U.S. and Mexico and over 900 dealer and partner locations worldwide. The company was founded in 1921 (93 years old!) and is based in beautiful Fort Worth, TX.

 

LT: And what do you do?
Rachel: I am one of our two community managers (shoutout to ahawkins) that are dedicated specifically to our two Jive communities. Our internal community launched at the end of April 2014 and has over 15,000 registered users today, with a 60% active rate. That community is like my third child! Our associates and field leaders amaze me every day with their brilliance and passion, and even our CEO gets in on the fun daily. Our external mobile support community is a great place to get answers for your techy woes.

 

LT: How do you use Jive (internal, external, etc)?
Rachel: Today, we are very focused on our internal community. My responsibilities lie primarily in adoption, engagement, and content management strategies. I spend my days evaluating community needs for content placement and governance; managing our executive engagement program; planning gamification strategies; working with other departments to form contests and engagement strategies; facilitating training for the community; and managing the moderator team.

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    Rachel in action: Presenting on the internal community and gamification at RadioShack's field leadership summit.


LT: Mac or PC?
Rachel: I have a Windows laptop that I can dock/undock quickly (perfect for those emergency meetings). But when I'm docked at my desk, I love my huge side monitor. I need to see all things at once!!

 

image.jpeg

   Rachel also needs to see what's happening outside and she has a huge window to do so. #windowenvy

 

LT: What's your mobile device?
Rachel: I have an iPhone 5s. My recent upgrade decision revolved heavily around my need for the new Jive app, since we run our internal community on Jive 7. iPhones are easy to use; I'm a PC girl, but my phone has to be Apple.

 

LT: Pick one word that best describes how you work.
Rachel: Fervidly

 

LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?
Rachel: Like I said, I HAVE to have the Jive app. When you run a community, you have to be able to consume content and navigate the way your users do. That practice I've had for years and it's saved me from running into huge problems with adoption and training. I also LOVE Pixlr. It's fantastic for whipping up a visual tool for a Jive Doc. And I absolutely cannot live without Google Docs!

 

LT: Do you have a favorite gadget?
Rachel: I don't leave the house without my RadioShack key-chain power bank. I have a double USB car charger that charges the key-chain and my phone and the same time, so I always have backup emergency power!

 

LT: Do you have a favorite to-do list manager?
Rachel: I love the Calendars 5 app. I have to see color coded tasks, events, and personal all in one place or I over commit easily.

 

LT: What you surround yourself with is important.  What is your workspace like?
Rachel: It's very colorful and bright! That keeps my disposition quite cheery. It also has reminders of my favorite things, like tons of pics of my kiddos and hubby, my companion cube cookie jar, and my Borderlands 2 art book.

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    Impossible not to be cheery looking at that baby face.

 

LT: Pictures are important, so is sound... do you listen to music while you work?
Rachel: I listen to a lot of metal and dubstep/rap; Bring Me The Horizon and Big Chocolate are my go-to energy boosters. I also get down to Beyonce's new album, but I have to be careful not to start randomly singing out loud with my headphones on!

 

LT: Can you share your best time-saving trick?
Rachel: Delegation. You're not always the best person to implement your vision. I recognize and deploy pieces of my big picture to those who know how to make them happen best.


LT: How do you balance work/life?

Rachel: This is always a tough one, especially when your job is in social media sites that have an app! My moderators are trained and empowered to handle minor upsets and are fantastic about escalating major issues appropriately. Standard operating procedures combined with rewarding and empowering your best users are key to being able to put down the phone and enjoy your family, friends, or you time.

 

LT: I almost hate to ask this since I see you have a baby... What's your sleep routine like?
Rachel: Yes, I have an 8-month-old, so my sleep is anything but routine.

 

LT: Sleep deprivation can be torture, so let's move on...  Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?
Rachel: Extrovert, for sure! I thrive on sharing ideas with others. I'm not afraid of being silly or grabbing the mic.

 

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received?
Rachel: I received this advice from my CEO at Ilfusion Creative (where I was the Director of Social Media Strategy): "You can't fall on every sword. Pick the battles that most need to be won, and fight those with the full fury of your passion." I want everything to be exactly right, but have had to learn to love the art of process.

 

LT: Fill in the blank...

Rachel: I'd love to see ___ Will Rose ___  answer these same questions.


LT: Pretty cool stuff. Check out this photo of Radio Shack's social media command center when they ran the surprise Super Bowl ad! (That's Rachel in the front, left)

ista.PNG

 

To thank Rachel Duran for her responses to this interview, I've made her a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture her workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Facebook timeline cover-size in case she wants to highlight her workstyle there.

 

Rachel Duran Workstyle.jpg

   If you would like to participate in the How I Work series and get a cool #workstyle graphic like the one above, just let me know!

SMDAY-Webinar-Ad_06-19-14.jpgThe last 5 years, Mashable has celebrated Social Media Day as a way to recognize the digital revolution happening right before our eyes. The best part about Social Media Day are the hundreds of meetups that happen all over the world. Want to get involved? Attend a Social Media Day Meetup near you and/or share why you love this day using #SMDay.

 

It's also a great time to stop and celebrate the awesome internal and external community managers, that are running the show across a variety of social platforms. The importance of and the number of community managers out there is growing and their skills are unique. They have to balance meeting their goals (growth, engagement, reach, ROI, closed tickets, etc) while making sure the story and personality shines through in content....and much, much more. See Community Manager Appreciation Day 2014.

 

It's imperative to stay on top of the evolving social media landscape, so here are some of the most fascinating changes recently for some of the more popular social media platforms:

 

 

Facebook:

  • It's all about the visual. Facebook's new layout affected the optimal photo sizing you're used to creating. Here's a new cheat sheet.
  • As Facebook is public (and because they can) brands are having to pay more and more in order for their content to be seen by even a portion of their community. Many users and brands are not happy with their new algorithm.
    "Only 43% of marketers feel like their Facebook efforts are working." - Social Media Examiner
  • On the other hand, Facebook Audience Insights have grown dramatically, and marketers are really able to fine tune their ad targeting, especially through Facebook's Power Editor Tool. I've seen great success using the Power Editor to create Dark Posts.

 

Twitter:

  • Twitter rolled out some interesting changes that make your profile more similar to Facebook: new header image, pinning a tweet to the top of your feed, and adding more info to your profile page. So now I can pin my Spurs tweet to the top of my page and share my UT pride in my header image. #GoSpursGo #Hookem

Screen Shot 2014-06-18 at 9.44.11 AM.png


LinkedIn:

  • LinkedIn has recently rolled out Showcase Pages, removing the Product and Services tab on your Company Page. This allows people to follow certain initiatives, products or services of each company and these pages act as an extension of your Company Page. Though, it was a bummer to lose all of those product/service recommendations! I think the jury is still out on the success or effectiveness of Showcase Pages.
  • LinkedIn awards their Premium users a profile that looks very similar to Facebook's (do you see a trend here?) in order to help them stand out in searches and to allow them a more personal feel. As I'm not a Premium member, I'm very jealous of this new profile - but it will roll out to non-Premium members soon. I can't wait! See how awesome Deirdre Walsh's profile page looks?

Screen Shot 2014-06-23 at 3.07.31 PM.png

 

Google+:

  • Google+ has grown in importance in my eyes mainly because of the SEO value. In fact, I'm shifting time away from Facebook to Google+ because of Facebook's new algorithm.
  • +Post ads is a new program launched that allows brand pages with more than 1,000 followers to promote their Google+ content posts via Google's AdSense program. Learn more. I'm excited to try this program out!

 

Our awesome, new Senior Community Manager, Libby Taylor, elaborates on Online Communities:

More and more businesses and organizations are establishing online social collaboration communities for their customers, partners and employees. While these kinds of forums have been around for years, some new trends are emerging:

  • Moving to the cloud. With easier upgrades and the latest sets of features, the cloud has it all. Rather than hosting communities themselves, more companies are moving to cloud-based technologies.
  • Executive bloggers. Gone are the days when executives communicate only through a team of spokes-people creating press releases. Executive blogging is on the rise and customers and employees are connecting with them real-time.
  • Peer-to-peer support. Getting answers to questions is happening more than ever within online communities and can sometimes be faster and easier than getting support from the companies themselves.

 

I hope you find these social platform updates helpful. I could go on and on about updates and what the future holds, but I would love to hear what your favorites changes to social media are as well as how you're celebrating #SMDay!

Are you physically and emotionally drained just thinking about the implications of an internal community? If you're looking for a little bit of confirmation bias in an effort to avoid this mess they call "social intranet", I've got you covered. Here are five reasons you should wad up that Jive proposal (because printing emails is so you) and chunk it in the ol' round filing cabinet.

 

1. Opinions Are Like…

Seriously… everyone has one. And who needs them? You’re a leader because you have all the answers. An online community is a breeding ground for everyone thinking they might have a great solution to a problem. You can only imagine how uppity they’ll be when they feel like they are really a part of a big change. Autonomy is like the mother of innovation. Speaking of which…

 

2. Change Is Hard

Why all the fuss about being innovative? Your company is sailing just above water, and there’s no sense in changing things; you’ve always done it this way and it’s working out fine. When your customers asked for a website, you said, “Why don’t they pick up a phone and order from the catalog like everyone else?” I'd even wager that your office uses carbon copy memos instead of that email nonsense. You, my friend, are hardcore – a leader with conviction.

 

3. Early Birds Get The Worm, And Worms Are Gross

How can you possibly know if something will work for your company before you wait and see if it works for your competitors first? What are you – NUTS?! Patience is a virtue, and virtuous you shall remain – just like Blockbuster, Borders, and Kodak.

 

4. It’s Risky Business

Allowing your employees to say things is just an invitation for risk. By launching an internal collaboration platform, you’re basically inviting a law suit to come over for dinner and drink all of your most expensive brandy. You’re better than that, friend. In fact, I’m willing to bet you’ve never been sued. Meaningful outcomes, be damned! In your cost-benefit analysis, no risk is too small for determining that entire projects should be ceremoniously catapulted from the 6th floor balcony. Now that you think about all that risk … you shouldn't be letting any employees speak to any customers or clients. Or each other. Well ok, maybe they can talk to each other in a text-documented manner with supervision. Oh wait...

 

5. Online Community = Social Media

You’re no fool! You see what’s going on here. Your team just wants a company-sanctioned "FriendFace" group to talk about … whatever it is they talk about. You don’t have any need for that hubbub, so why should they? Just because mobile and social is how your employees naturally communicate, that doesn't mean you have to follow suit. Excuse me, but you are a LEADER, not a FOLLOWER, amiright?

 

If any of these five fears fit your style, then you’re absolutely right – an online internal collaboration platform is definitely not for you. But come to think of it, you may not be right for your company. The modern business environment doesn't seem to fit your management style.

Screen Shot 2014-06-13 at 4.58.48 PM.pngI'm no stranger to the soccer field. My dad, whose college nickname was Elep (Pele backwards), spent many weekends teaching me the sport and cheering me on at games. While it has been many years since I've played, I’m still able to take the lessons learned on the grass and apply them to my role as a social strategist.

 

In honor of The World Cup kickoff and Father's Day, I've created this list of the top nine social lessons learned from soccer.

 

1. Master the Fundamentals

Just like players need to understand how to dribble, pass, and shoot, community managers must develop a core set of skills.  These talents include content creation, project management, and relationship building. Once you master these competences, you can move on to advanced techniques like gamification, business analytics, and platform optimization.

 

2. Listen to Your Coach

A strategic, passionate coach is a key to winning. Community managers must also have an executive sponsor who is vested in the success of the team. This leader authorizes funding and resources, approves key policies, and champions the success of the program among the e-staff. Most importantly, the executive sponsor has the strength to empower cultural change.

 

3. Have a Game Plan

In sports, every game plan is unique. Similarly, each roadmap to online community success varies. That’s because businesses use communities to accomplish a wide range of goals, such as customer support, strategic alignment, partner relationships, etc. Despite the variety, community managers must have a well-documented plan with measurable objectives, strategic use cases and technical features prioritized on potential impact to the business and ability to execute.

 

4. Be 100% Committed

Good soccer players are dedicated 24/7.  They practice, watch what they eat, and live and breathe the game. The same applies to social professionals.  It’s an “always on” job. There are no customer service timeouts or Twitter rainouts. When conversations spike or news breaks, the community manager has to be available.

 

5. Play with Passion

As with anything in life, you are more successful if you’re passionate. Luckily with both soccer and social that zeal comes naturally.

 

6. Keep a Level Head

Just like soccer opponents try to slide tackle you, online communities are full of strikes on the brand. It’s crucial for community managers to help alleviate tense situations and not fuel them.

 

7. Find Strength in Your Team

Many of the world’s leading soccer scorers have contributed their success to the pinpoint passing skills of their teammates. Likewise, good community managers rely on strong communication and collaboration with individuals across the organization. Everyone from legal to marketing has a position to play.

 

8. Appreciate Your Fans

Every soccer team has a set of rabid fans, but so do strong online communities. That’s because these online networks are more than just modern communication vehicles. They are made up of people who have a shared passion and shared “why.” Renowned community managers put their fans first; empowering, amplifying and rewarding them.

 

9. Celebrate Your Gooooaaaalllls!

In both soccer and social, numbers matter. Nothing is more rewarding then winning!

 

From kids playing in the streets of St. Louis to professionals duking it out in Brazil, soccer touches so many lives.  In the same light, so does social. I’ve watched as the role of community manager has evolved from something delegated to the intern into a respected profession sought out by the world’s most powerful brands. No matter where you fall on the spectrum of either, know that you are part of something big.

 

If you like this post, feel free to download the related SlideShare presentation, "Top 9 Social Lessons Learned from Soccer."

Innovation is the life blood of any enterprise’s success and growth. Embracing innovative ideas is important for any brand’s sustained leadership in the market. History is testimonial to the fact; businesses which have not implemented new ideas on time have eventually been elbowed out of business by competition… and organizations which have resisted the needed change have perished without trace. While it is normal for organizations to strive for excellence, claim to be receptive to new ideas and accommodative to changes; seldom do we see them doing something real to make innovations happen.

inno1.jpeg

 

A survey by Price Waterhouse Cooper’s reveals ‘61% of CEOs worldwide say that innovation is a primary concern within their businesses’. A recent Bain & Company survey found that two-thirds of enterprise executives named innovation as one of their top three priorities.
We know well, an organization is a large pool of innovative ideas; people whether they are employees or customers or partners have great ideas to make a business successful. But the real challenge is how to tap this collective intelligence for common good. People have great ideas; they have the wish to participate but there isn’t any platform where they will be heard & valued. People in the bottom rungs of the organization often don’t have access to the top management. But does that necessarily mean they couldn’t have ‘life changing’ ideas?


Let’s accept, managing Innovation is tricky. It needs a lot of deliberate efforts to build an active appetite for innovation. How to build the right strategy for innovation? Could Innovation be managed & fostered?  Here are some great ways an enterprise could make INNOVATION happen!


Don’t hesitate to be repetitive
A professor of Physics in a University used to repeat the same question in every exam he gave to the students. ‘Same question in every exam? Why would you do this?’ asked his fellows in academics. ‘You could always ask different questions?’
The professor replied earnestly ‘the question no doubt is the same but as far as I get different answers I am OK. I get new versions of the answer every time because the students are evolving with every class & exam. In that sense I actually get new ways to solve the same problem every time’.

Innovation is highly iterative. It’s not linear… it happens in cycles. Innovation is a journey. In this journey you often experience ‘déjà vu’…and sometimes frustrations too. It’s a continuous process. If you have developed a great ‘mobile app’ today… chances are the competition comes out with an even better one next week. Mind you! It’s a journey chasing excellence. There is no destination.


Suggestions@xyz.com’ is not enough for innovation to happen.
Many enterprises have email IDs such as ideas@xyz.com where people are expected to share their ideas for some great innovation. But…hardly anyone actually shares anything. Eventually the ID becomes a junk box/ a black hole which no one even bothers to check. Such initiatives only increase the chaos. ‘Digital suggestion box’ is not the right way to foster innovation. Innovation doesn’t happen that way. Innovation needs a mature platform.


Provide people with a platform to ideate… They all can’t be in the boardroom
Study by ‘Idea Champions’ reveals- only 3 percent of the people come up with their best ideas at work. The other 97 percent said their best ideas come to them while they are in the shower, on vacation, taking walks, enjoying a glass of wine, or just doing nothing.
Often we too have our ‘eureka’ moments in the cafeteria or while attending a boring conference call
J but all we could do is park the idea to be discussed in the next office meeting. No wonder ideas die before they are incepted.


Having an Enterprise Social Network (ESN) doesn’t guarantee innovation

Innovation doesn’t happen by chance. Ideation should be an active, repeatable & quantifiable business process within the organization. ESN could be a great way to enable collecting ideas. Ideas could be crowdsourced from customers, employees, partners etc in the internal & external communities of the enterprise. While this is important for innovation; even more is how these ideas are driven from concept to reality. Most of the ideas which emerge as great ones do not get materialized because there isn’t a mechanism in place to incubate and implement them.

 

Enterprise Innovation Management (EIM) could make an enterprise thrive on innovations

A true collaborative enterprise should have a platform to make innovations happen. There has to be system which should actively capture, share & evaluate ideas. Ideas should go through a ‘graduation’ process where they are evaluated on various parameters by people from different groups. It’s a process to separate wheat from chaff. It’s a process to separate real signals from noise.inno2.JPG


People need collaboration and mobility tools to work anywhere, any time. Ideation could be workflowed into the daily works of the employees. In most of the enterprises Innovation is still a siloed, separate activity.

Implementation of the qualified ideas is key to successful innovation

Once the idea graduates; there has to be the further necessary actions like budgeting, funding, Go to Market, Product Management initiatives, RoI calculations, customer communications, Trials/ POCs etc. Many people are required to bring ideas into action. This could be done assigning people with necessary ‘tasks & projects’ in a time bound manner. Collecting ideas is important but even more important is what we do of the ideas we collect.

 

Ensure participation & engagement of all stakeholders
Methods for engagement like gamification could help in motivating employees to participate in the ideation process. It’s a way to instill ‘high value’ behaviors in people. As per McKinsey 50% of highly profitable companies have 50% more engaged employees versus unprofitable companies. What drives profit? Excellence & Innovation at work right? Gamification exactly helps in doing that.

 


Measure. Think. Repeat
Idea Analytics could help in monitoring how the process of ideation is fairing. How people are participating & sharing. Reports/ dashboards/ data visualizations help to keep a tab on the entire Innovation management process right from inception to implementation.

 

Keep ideas safe so they are not stolen away
Proper Access & Identity Management could help to ensure only the right people see the details of the ideas and all discussions around them. Be pragmatic. You never know, some disgruntled employees might take your nice ideas to the competition before you implement them. Be ware.


Remember no idea is bad… only that its time hasn’t come.
If an idea cannot be implemented immediately; it always remains in the repository to be evaluated later. No idea is bad. Every idea has it’s time. Sometimes a great idea comes out of nowhere and jumps into your lap. You never recognize it at first as a great idea, then suddenly it hits you “it’s a GREAT IDEA” you just never noticed it before.

EIM (Enterprise Innovation Management) is a platform to manage ideas and make innovation happen. It helps to check that ideas don’t slip through the cracks.

A successful enterprise would always find ways to manage ideas properly. It would strive to harness and not hamper innovation.


Unsuccessful enterprises have many options...of which one could be to remain content with an email ID like:
we_need_some_great_ideas_now!_Hurry! send_them immediately@xyz.com


What would you be like?

photo.JPG

Usually when you meet someone for the first time, there are the customary pleasantries and common questions you exchange to get to know that person, like where they are from, and what college they went to, but my personal favorite is, “what do you do for a living?” When I tell somebody I do social media for a software company, there are typically a number of reactions that I encounter, including, but not limited to:

 

  • How do you do that for business exactly?
  • How did you get started in that?
  • Do you just play on Facebook all day?
  • What’s the ROI?
  • Blank stares (at which time, I elaborate).

 

I’ve come up with a number of answers over the years for all of these questions and reactions, some serious, some quirky, but I never get tired of discussing the topic. Most people’s initial reaction to my response is “wow, that’s super cool!” And I might be a bit biased, but I would have to say, I agree. I love what I do; it’s always changing and challenging and most importantly, interesting.

 

Now, I get to add an even cooler chapter to my story – working for Jive. As the new Social Media Marketing Manager, I can’t wait to dive into the discussion and get to know all of you. I’ll go first – I attended Santa Clara University, am originally from San Mateo, CA, and am a self proclaimed Disney geek who loves taking ballet classes. I’m sure you’ll see all of these aspects of what makes me “me” seep into my writing in the future.

 

I’m certain that this will be my next big adventure, and like all of you, I’m excited to continually improve my #workstyle.

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