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Will Rose has been in the Jive Community for four years now. In my mind, that makes him an expert here! I had to stalk him a little bit to give you a summary, since he and I have never worked together before this interview. Here's what I found.

 

How I Work - Will image.jpg

Will has been the enterprise community manager for T-mobile's external community which has around 60,000 users. His community, which serves T-mobile's customers, is on fire with content which reflects how hot mobile is in the world right now. How does Will manage it all? Find out by reading his interview below.

 

Libby: Where do you work (location, in the office, remotely, etc.)?

Will: I work for T-Mobile USA, the nation's 4th largest wireless service provider, and am based at our corporate headquarters in Bellevue, Washington.  Everything you've heard about Seattle weather is absolutely true!  9 months out of the year we're the most dedicated worker bees, but when that sun gods bless us, you'll likely find us on the lake.

 

LT: How would you describe your current job?

Will: I lead a team of technical wizards within the Knowledge Management organization which reports into Customer Service. We're something of a Shadow IT operation.  We do it all -- from requirements gathering and UI/UX design to development and deployment.  We take pride in saying "Yes!" when IT says "No".

 

LT: That's sounds pretty cool! How do you use Jive at work (internal, external, etc)?

Will: We've pretty much done it all (perhaps not all of it particularly well...) with Jive. With 8 Jive instances (7 hosted, 1 cloud), we have something for pretty much everyone. We have a more traditional Customer Support community (support.t-mobile.com) where we house both Support documentation and customer peer-to-peer discussions. And that's about where the 'traditional' use cases stop.  We have a community used primarily as a knowledge base for our front-line Customer Service (call center) and Sales (retail) representatives. We also have several communities which are more strictly 'locked down' and used as knowledge bases to support various 'partner brands' (see support.gosmartmobile.com) and retail partners (you know, like those kiosks you see in malls).  Seems weird to use a social software like Jive in a reduced or completely 'read-only' state, but we love how easy Jive has made it for us to customize the experience.

 

LT: What's your preference: Mac or PC (or something else)?

Will: Both? The Mac is my daily driver, but IT likes to remind me T-Mobile is a Windows shop. There aren't many folks at T-Mobile who use Macs... there are so few that  IT almost refuses to support them. To combat this, I started a Mac Users group in our community for us to connect and share workarounds. That VPN setup IT didn't know how to set up on a Mac? Documented! That cloud printing service that we were told would only work with a PC?  Documented!

 

LT: You really are a Shadow IT Hero! What mobile device do you use?

Will: iPhone 5s / iPad Air.  I used to be a hardcore Android user, flashing custom ROMs and whatnot, but I've given in completely to the will of Steve Jobs. The Apple ecosystem has me and I can't let it go.

 

LT: If I forced you to pick one word that best describes how you work, what would it be?

Will: "Maverick"

 

LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?

Will: Adobe Photoshop because we like to 'fake it til we make it'.

 

LT: Oh my gosh, me too. I can't live without PhotoShop! I'm an HTML widget queen. I love me some image maps.

 

LT: Besides your phone and computer, do you have a favorite gadget?

Will: My iPad. I haven't exactly gotten on the 'use my tablet for work' train yet, but it is great for playing games and surfing the ol' Interweb.

 

LT: What's your favorite to-do list manager?

Will: The sticky notes on my monitor.  If it aint there, it aint getting done!

 

LT: What you surround yourself with is important, what's your workspace like?

Will: Here, take a look!

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LT: Nice view! What's your best time-saving trick?

Will: If i saved any more time I think they'd question the need for my position!

 

LT: How do you balance work and life?

Will: I come in late and leave early. Seriously. I have a two-year old and try to maximize my time with him vs. maximizing the time the daycare has with him. That might mean I get to the office around 9 and try to start wrapping things up around 4. After he goes to bed though I pull the laptop back out and finish anything up I didn't get to or simply get a jump on the next day.

 

LT: That's exactly what I did when my kids were still little. It really makes things work better at home.

 

LT: Nice view! What do you listen to while you work?

Will: I'm pretty eclectic when it comes to music (sorry country fans, you can check your twang at the door) so the playlist can vary from The Beatles to 2Pac, Adele to Skrillex.  I try not to go directly from 'poppin a cap' to 'rollin in the deep', but you never know what can happen when you hit Shuffle.

tupacadele.jpg

  Here's what happens when I put 2Pac a little too close to Adele and then shake them up in Photoshop. Plus I found some delicious mash-ups for your enjoyment (warning Tupac's language is not for the faint of heart):

 

LT: Thanks for giving me a nice diversion looking for 2Pac/Tupac/Adele mashups!


LT: Next question, what's your sleep routine like?

Will: Not awesome. I try to get to sleep by midnight and I'm back up around 6:30.

 

LT: Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?

Will: I'm the most extroverted introvert you'll ever meet!  x2 after I have a beer... or two...

 

LT: Would that make it extroverted introvert x4? Sounds like fun.

 

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received (and from whom)?

Will: Seek first to understand, then to be understood. Thanks Stephen Covey! The '5 Habits of Highly Effective People' is a great book.  I have to be honest, I didn't go into it thinking much of these 'corporate self-help' books, but this one was worth the read!

 

LT: Fill in the blank in the sentence below...

Will: I'd love to see Dennis Pearce answer these same questions.


To thank Will Rose for his responses to this interview, I've made him a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture his workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Facebook header photo-size in case he wants to highlight his workstyle there and can be popped into Twitter as a background image as well. Super handy.

Will Rose Workstyle.jpg


Remember back when you were a child and you heard older kids talking about summer camp and how fun it was?

The canoe races, the horseback riding... making crafts, swimming in the lake and sleeping under the stars... and don't forget the s'mores! It all sounded like heaven to me.


That's how I feel about JiveWorld14.

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   S'mores at JiveWorld? I say YES.

 

I've heard the stories about JiveWorld, wondered at the legends... Seen pictures that looked like a technicolor nightclub on steroids. Just like summer camp, I've always wanted to attend but never could get the trip approved.

 

The funny thing is, now that I'm working at Jive, I'm helping to plan JiveWorld14!

 

I'm in charge of Social Business Boot Camp, the day-long pre-conference training before JiveWorld begins. It's an appropriate assignment considering that Boot Camp is aimed at people new to Jive (either as prospects or new customers). So as far as the topics we are covering, I feel right at home.

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We're planning a lot of fun speakers and activities for our boot campers, so if you plan on attending JiveWorld14, be sure to indicate that you want to attend Boot Camp as well. It's part of the JiveWorld price of admission (in other words, it's FREE!).

 

When is Boot Camp?

 

Date: Tuesday, October 21 – 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM (BTW: JiveWorld's main sessions are Wednesday, October 22 - Thursday, October 23)

Where: The Cosmopolitan, Las Vegas


Why Attend?

 

  •     Hear real-world stories of social business success.
  •     Build the business case for launching social technologies at your organization.
  •     Understand how to win over executives, IT, legal, HR, business units and end users.
  •     Network with Jive customers and social business strategists who’ve been in your shoes.

 

By the way, if you are planning on attending JiveWorld14, the early bird registration ends July 31st! That's just days away, people! You better get on it!

 

So pack up your back pack, rinse out your canteen, bring your bug spray - then meet me at Boot Camp!

 

Register right now, in fact.

 

Just click the button below, you know you want to.

 

Want to see what happens at JiveWorld? You can watch video from last year's event at JiveWorld365!

Ryan Rutan needs no introduction, but I'm going to give him one anyway!

 

In the Jive Community, he has acted as the Community Manager, key app developer, and general rockstar Jiver. People flock to him to get his autograph at JiveWorld and his all-night hack-a-thons have changed lives (at least that's what the legends say). And while we won't go into his personal life here, I have proof that he is an overall amazing human being.

 

How I Work - Ryan image.jpg

    If Jive were a kingdom, Ryan would definitely be the crown prince.


Let's find out what a day-in-the-life of Ryan looks like below.

 

Libby Taylor: Hey Ryan, you've had a huge impact on the Jive Community. My endless thanks to you! Let's get down to business, we know you work for Jive, but where do you conduct your magic?

Ryan: I live (and work) in the greatest city in the world.  Austin, TX. Where technology instinctively flocks like the salmon of Capistrano!

 

LT: And what is your current gig (besides being amazing)?

Ryan: Currently I am Jive's Developer Evangelist, which allows me to work with some of the best customers, partners and prospects to talk about social business problems and how to build solutions using the Jive Platform.  #winning

 

LT: How do you use Jive at work (internal, external, etc)?

Ryan: The easiest answer I can give is the number: 118. That is the average number of tabs of Jive that I have open on my computer at home on any given day (for realz). Jive allows me to execute on work at a pace that rivals the speed at which I think. So how do I use Jive?  Ever-presently!

 

LT: I'm almost afraid to ask because I can only imagine your work space, what computer system do you use?

Ryan: Fully Loaded 3.4Ghz Quad-Core Ivy Bridge iMac with 3 x 27" Monitors. When I travel, I have to use my laptop, an iPad and iPhone in tandem to feel as though I'm not being 1/3 less productive.

 

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   I don't know, I think I see space for at least another monitor or maybe a few more devices. #multitasking


LT: I can almost answer this question myself by looking at your desk.. what is your current mobile device situation:

Ryan: It is no secret, I am a Mac addict.  I am currently rocking an iPhone 5s, and have plans to reintroduce a wrist watch to my arm when the iWatch is released.  A bit much?  Probably, but I'm OK with that. =)


LT: And don't forget your iPad too...


LT: What one word best describes your work style?

Ryan: Efficient. When it comes to work, I find that doing one thing at a time is boring. If I don't have multiple things in motion, I lose track of what's going on. Fun fact: I've set the high score on every Speed of Light machine I've ever played. =)


LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?

Ryan: First on the list is definitely multiple monitors. I don't care what people say, but square footage of monitor real-estate trumps any multitasking software. Next would definitely be a solid Terminal window implementation with transparent background, because sometimes you just need to see what's going in the background. When it comes to software, there's a tie for 3rd between the OS X's spotlight launcher (can't wait for Yosemite!!!!!) and Google Chrome, but to throw one more piece of hardware on the list ... it would have to be my split key natural keyboard(s) by Microsoft. (That last one is hard for me to say aloud, thank you for listening).


LT: Not to beat the tech topic into the ground but besides your phone, iPad, multiple screens and computer, what gadget can't you live without?

Ryan: That's pretty hard, but I think I would have to say my WiFi/Router, but a close second is my Apple TV.  I remember back in the day running coax cables for token ring networks, tripping over tangled cables and installing clunky network cards. Nowadays, I have to worry more about channel interference and what to name my WiFi hot spot so my neighbors think I'm cool. My neighbor has his named "FBI Surveillance Van" ... I'd love to get suggestions on how to top that!

 

LT: Maybe Jive Community members can add name suggestions for your WiFi hot spot in the comments below!

 

LT: You seem to get a lot done in a little time. What's your favorite to-do list manager?

Ryan: Hands down, it is Evernote. Usually my to-do's are so scattered, but Evernote makes it super simple for me to record notes via text, pictures or even sound ... and I can easily follow-up on said items and knock them off the list. Besides that, I would have to say my brain, as I tend to process and retain most of my to-do's there for a while before they make it to Evernote (and I like it that way).

 

LT: Although we've already seen a picture of it, would you like to comment on what it's like to work in your workspace?

Ryan: In any given day/week, my workspace goes from immaculate to cluttered, to stacked to unbalanced, to messy to just enough room, to time to push it all off into a box, to digging through the box, to putting things from the box in their right place and back to immaculate.  It's a vicious cycle!

 

LT: What's your best time-saving trick?

Ryan: Don't solely rely on asynchronous communication to get things done, like approvals. Most times, time spent waiting and tracking down people to get approvals on their own time wastes time and keeps things in the forefront longer than they need to be. Take the extra minute, track the person down (by IM, phone, carrier pigeon) and let them know that you are reaching out to them. If the person isn't there, find someone in the office that you know works on their team or sits near the person and ask them to let that person know you are looking for them. The time you save in back and forth missed connections adds up fast!

 

Ryan: Also, trust your instincts and don't second guess. Don't be afraid of being wrong or putting your thoughts out into the open for others to see and contribute. The more we share, the more we work better together!

 

LT: Besides the hum of all those monitors, what do you listen to while you work?

Ryan: It depends. If I'm doing creative writing, then I can't listen to music by my favorite artists; otherwise, I would bust out into song and rock the mouse like a microphone all too often.  So I tend to listen to disposable interchangeable upbeat modern artists during the day to keep my brain firing, and when I want to relax...I chillax to the Counting Crows!  (Side note: I've got back stage passes to meet them on July 30th, so that will be awesome.)

 

LT: What's your sleep routine like?

Ryan: Minimal. Plenty of time to sleep when you are dead. Prior to marriage and family life, I averaged about 4 hours of sleep a night, I'm up to a solid 6 now, but I only do so for the safety of others. =)

 

LT: I'm fairly sure I would die on 4 hours of sleep a night. Six would still be tough.

 

LT: Personality-wise, are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?

Ryan: I've been clinically tested as both an introvert and extrovert, and I have the sticker(s) to prove it!

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received?

Ryan: Ask big ... get big. There is no harm in going big on an ask, the worst that can happen is that they say no. Be confident and do not shy away from something you want, especially if you know that you are capable of putting in the work to achieve it.

 

LT: Thanks for a great interview, Ryan! Who would you like to be interviewed next?

Ryan: Weird Al Yankovic (the most versatile and talented musician of all-time)

 

weird al.jpg

  Yeah... sorry Ryan, interviewing Weird Al is just not going to happen. Fun idea though.

 

 

To thank Ryan Rutan for his responses to this interview, I've made him a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture his workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Twitter header photo-size in case he wants to highlight his workstyle there. I know it looks gigantic, but it'll look great once he pops it into Twitter and sizes it...

 

Ryan Rutan Workstyle.jpg

    If you would like to participate in the How I Work series and get a cool #workstyle graphic like the one above, just let me know!


I think all of our folks in the Developer group should see this too!

So you've got yourself an online community and need someone to take care of it... Considering the recent wave of Web 2.0 technologies and the advancement of community and forum-type platforms, you think it would be easy to find someone who can head up a community, right?

Not even close.

 

The job of community manager is a fairly new one and often encompasses a wide range of roles and responsibilities. Finding just the right person to fit the bill can be a challenge. Starting with the right job description is critical to making the right hire for the position. The bottom line is that you won't find someone who can do every single thing on your list. You'll need to know up-front which responsibilities are more critical to your community than the others.

 

DETERMINE WHAT YOU NEED

Consider these points when writing up the job description:

  • What level of project management will your Community Manager need? Is this a senior position where the CM will drive the strategy for an enterprise community consisting of thousands of users? Or is this role for an already established community where there are others driving the direction of the program?
  • What are the specific skills needed to manage your community effectively? For some communities, the CM will need to be able to do a little bit of everything. From graphic design, to writing, to analytics, you will have to determine which of the broad range of activities are most important for your community manager.
  • Is the position internally or externally facing? If your community manager will be dealing with customers on a regular basis then the job description needs to highlight that factor. On the other hand, if your community manager will need to navigate the inner workings of company politics, then that's another skill set altogether.

 

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIESTechnical resource.jpg

Here's a list of possible Community Manager roles and responsibilities:

  • Help desk: Respond to user questions, help on-board new groups. Act as a technical expert for the community. Elevate questions that cannot be answered to your support team.
  • Teacher/trainer: Create help documents, videos, and host events where users are trained on how to make the most of your platform. Get ready for a lot of change management in this part of the role.
  • Hand-holder: To nurture engagement you have to hold some hands. Connect with users, encourage their activity, ensure questions have a response.
  • Project Manager – Communities don’t build themselves. There needs to be somebody who's got the big picture in mind. You’re going to be responsible for creating and delivering all kinds of reports, briefings, fact sheets, and metrics and you’re going to need a plan for how to meet those deadlines and still engage with the community itself.
  • Consultant: Groups will come to you to find out how they can best use the community to get work done. You'll need to be prepared to act as both experts and adviser in these consultations.
  • Writer: From blog posts to help documents, the community manager should have a voice and writing skills to back it up.
  • Cheerleader: Enthusiasm for the job and the community are a must have! Your community should feel the love and positive energy. Celebrate community successes.
  • Graphic designer: You want your site to look pretty, don't you? Having graphic design skills can make your community manager a superstar in your organization. Let's face it, everyone wants to look good.
  • Referee: At times, you might need to step in between users or else make the call on whether something should or should not be posted. At the end of the day, you want everyone to make nice and get along. Or at least agree to disagree.
  • Marketeer: Advertise activities to promote new users and engage returning visitors. You might even need to advertise outside your community in order to draw people in.
  • Psychologist: For many, blogging in a community is an act of self-exposure that is uncomfortable to some people. You might have to help people, especially executives, overcome their fear of being that transparent.
  • Party host: Your community is the longest running party you will ever plan and attend. Your job is to make sure the fridge is stocked, drinks are flowing, and music is playing all night long. You'll also have to make sure the room looks good and the invites are send and resent as needed.
  • Comedian: Let's face it, life is better when you are having fun. Make your community laugh once in a while, it's good for them and boost engagement. Comedy can also stir up things when content gets stale.
  • Leader: Admit it, you can't do everything yourself. By engaging other people to help you with certain aspect of your community, you'll be building a strong network of advocates who will keep your community alive when you need to do things, like sleep, for example.
  • Advocate: When bugs pop up, and they always do, you'll need to raise the issue up with developers to get them fixed. Or when things can't be fixed, explaining the situation and smoothing feathers in the may be required.
  • Ambassador: If your site is customer-facing, your community manager should be ready to be the brand and speak to the decisions and key strategies of your company.
  • Analyst: Behind every community is a pile of numbers, numbers that need slicing and dicing to make up the reports that the sponsors of your community will demand.
  • Police man: Monitor posts and moderate as needed: Keep a watchful eye on the community. Provide rapid response for inappropriate or flagged posts. Deactivate or delete users when necessary.
  • Janitor: Every good party needs some clean up every once in a while. From dead groups to out of date content, regular cleaning of the community is necessary for the health and wellness of your site.

 

Here's a good example of a community manager job description:

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JOB DESCRIPTION - EXAMPLE

Jive is seeking a socially savvy and driven individual to champion the use of our own products to the benefit of our employees in the Brewspace community. The enterprise community manager will consult with individual business units to develop a plan to optimize the use of the internal community to meet the needs for collaboration as well as help our employees better engage with customers. This individual will be responsible for the strategy and management of Jive's social intranet and develop strong relations with the external senior community manager to execute on a single strategy for community management. The internal community manager will report to the Sr. Social Media Manager.

 

General Responsibilities:

    • Determine strategy for home page architecture and design
    • Engage closely with each business unit to consult on how to get the most value out of the community
    • Develop a plan for community improvements and how new use cases will be brought on board.
    • Define and set measurable goals for each major Jive community. 
    • Mentor and advise designated space/group community managers to help them curate and optimize their respective social channels
    • Develop and/or facilitate employee-wide trainings on community best practices
    • Help define and enforce consistent governance policies
    • Lead by example in promoting an open, positive and active employee community
    • Motivate and engage users daily; create excitement around community initiatives
    • Work with the help desk to identify issues and track them through to resolution
    • Coordinate with marketing to represent community management best practices and case studies to external audiences via blog posts, presentations, etc.
    • Develop of network of community advocates to help champion best practices and groups.
    • Work closely with Jive product management to triage and funnel user requirements for inclusion into the product road map when appropriate
    • Create and manage social rewards and recognition program for employees
    • Develop and report metrics consisting of both qualitative and quantitative measurements that helps Jive evaluate collaboration
    • Stay up to date on the latest social trends

Qualifications:

    • Excellent organizational, writing, and presentation skills
    • 5-7 years project management experience
    • Open and honest communication skills
    • Hands-on and self-driven
    • Passionate about community best practices, principles, concepts, and technologies
    • Ability to work collaboratively with a geographically-distributed workforce
    • Ability to work across all functional organizations as well as levels in the organization
    • Basic UI/UX design knowledge
    • Multi-tasker who understands how to develop tactical plans that align with the company's strategy

 

Before you cut and paste this position word-for-word, remember that your community is a living, breathing organism that deserves the best community manager you can find. This list should only be a starting point.

 

In the end, finding a community manager that fits the job requirements and company culture is up to you.

Good luck!

 

 

Sources:

Community Manager Job Description, A Definitive Guide « Social Fresh

The Many Roles of an Internal Community Manager | Social Media Strategery


Cross-posted in: Internal Communities External Communities Blogs: Social Business

Rachel Duran is no newcomer to community management. She's written some excellent blogs in the Jive Community including 5 Tips for Becoming an Expert in Your Community and also 5 Reasons Why An Internal Community May Not Be Right For You. She'll also be speaking at JiveWorld14 for a session called Connect the Dots: How RadioShack created viral internal engagement.

How I Work - Rachel image.jpg

    Rachel's got enthusiasm you can almost smell. Okay, maybe you can't smell it, but you sure can FEEL it.

 

Get the feeling for what it's like to be in Rachel's shoes by reading more below!

 

Libby Taylor: Let's start with the obvious, where do you work?
Rachel: I work for the RadioShack Corporation. RadioShack is an international electronics retailer with 4,500 company-operated stores in the U.S. and Mexico and over 900 dealer and partner locations worldwide. The company was founded in 1921 (93 years old!) and is based in beautiful Fort Worth, TX.

 

LT: And what do you do?
Rachel: I am one of our two community managers (shoutout to Andy Hawkins) that are dedicated specifically to our two Jive communities. Our internal community launched at the end of April 2014 and has over 15,000 registered users today, with a 60% active rate. That community is like my third child! Our associates and field leaders amaze me every day with their brilliance and passion, and even our CEO gets in on the fun daily. Our external mobile support community is a great place to get answers for your techy woes.

 

LT: How do you use Jive (internal, external, etc)?
Rachel: Today, we are very focused on our internal community. My responsibilities lie primarily in adoption, engagement, and content management strategies. I spend my days evaluating community needs for content placement and governance; managing our executive engagement program; planning gamification strategies; working with other departments to form contests and engagement strategies; facilitating training for the community; and managing the moderator team.

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    Rachel in action: Presenting on the internal community and gamification at RadioShack's field leadership summit.


LT: Mac or PC?
Rachel: I have a Windows laptop that I can dock/undock quickly (perfect for those emergency meetings). But when I'm docked at my desk, I love my huge side monitor. I need to see all things at once!!

 

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   Rachel also needs to see what's happening outside and she has a huge window to do so. #windowenvy

 

LT: What's your mobile device?
Rachel: I have an iPhone 5s. My recent upgrade decision revolved heavily around my need for the new Jive app, since we run our internal community on Jive 7. iPhones are easy to use; I'm a PC girl, but my phone has to be Apple.

 

LT: Pick one word that best describes how you work.
Rachel: Fervidly

 

LT: What apps/software/tools can't you live without?
Rachel: Like I said, I HAVE to have the Jive app. When you run a community, you have to be able to consume content and navigate the way your users do. That practice I've had for years and it's saved me from running into huge problems with adoption and training. I also LOVE Pixlr. It's fantastic for whipping up a visual tool for a Jive Doc. And I absolutely cannot live without Google Docs!

 

LT: Do you have a favorite gadget?
Rachel: I don't leave the house without my RadioShack key-chain power bank. I have a double USB car charger that charges the key-chain and my phone and the same time, so I always have backup emergency power!

 

LT: Do you have a favorite to-do list manager?
Rachel: I love the Calendars 5 app. I have to see color coded tasks, events, and personal all in one place or I over commit easily.

 

LT: What you surround yourself with is important.  What is your workspace like?
Rachel: It's very colorful and bright! That keeps my disposition quite cheery. It also has reminders of my favorite things, like tons of pics of my kiddos and hubby, my companion cube cookie jar, and my Borderlands 2 art book.

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    Impossible not to be cheery looking at that baby face.

 

LT: Pictures are important, so is sound... do you listen to music while you work?
Rachel: I listen to a lot of metal and dubstep/rap; Bring Me The Horizon and Big Chocolate are my go-to energy boosters. I also get down to Beyonce's new album, but I have to be careful not to start randomly singing out loud with my headphones on!

 

LT: Can you share your best time-saving trick?
Rachel: Delegation. You're not always the best person to implement your vision. I recognize and deploy pieces of my big picture to those who know how to make them happen best.


LT: How do you balance work/life?

Rachel: This is always a tough one, especially when your job is in social media sites that have an app! My moderators are trained and empowered to handle minor upsets and are fantastic about escalating major issues appropriately. Standard operating procedures combined with rewarding and empowering your best users are key to being able to put down the phone and enjoy your family, friends, or you time.

 

LT: I almost hate to ask this since I see you have a baby... What's your sleep routine like?
Rachel: Yes, I have an 8-month-old, so my sleep is anything but routine.

 

LT: Sleep deprivation can be torture, so let's move on...  Are you more of an introvert or an extrovert?
Rachel: Extrovert, for sure! I thrive on sharing ideas with others. I'm not afraid of being silly or grabbing the mic.

 

LT: What's the best advice you've ever received?
Rachel: I received this advice from my CEO at Ilfusion Creative (where I was the Director of Social Media Strategy): "You can't fall on every sword. Pick the battles that most need to be won, and fight those with the full fury of your passion." I want everything to be exactly right, but have had to learn to love the art of process.

 

LT: Fill in the blank...

Rachel: I'd love to see ___ Will Rose ___  answer these same questions.


LT: Pretty cool stuff. Check out this photo of Radio Shack's social media command center when they ran the surprise Super Bowl ad! (That's Rachel in the front, left)

ista.PNG

 

To thank Rachel Duran for her responses to this interview, I've made her a magical montage of the people, things, and terms that capture her workstyle. And it's in a handy dandy Facebook timeline cover-size in case she wants to highlight her workstyle there.

 

Rachel Duran Workstyle.jpg

   If you would like to participate in the How I Work series and get a cool #workstyle graphic like the one above, just let me know!

SMDAY-Webinar-Ad_06-19-14.jpgThe last 5 years, Mashable has celebrated Social Media Day as a way to recognize the digital revolution happening right before our eyes. The best part about Social Media Day are the hundreds of meetups that happen all over the world. Want to get involved? Attend a Social Media Day Meetup near you and/or share why you love this day using #SMDay.

 

It's also a great time to stop and celebrate the awesome internal and external community managers, that are running the show across a variety of social platforms. The importance of and the number of community managers out there is growing and their skills are unique. They have to balance meeting their goals (growth, engagement, reach, ROI, closed tickets, etc) while making sure the story and personality shines through in content....and much, much more. See Community Manager Appreciation Day 2014.

 

It's imperative to stay on top of the evolving social media landscape, so here are some of the most fascinating changes recently for some of the more popular social media platforms:

 

 

Facebook:

  • It's all about the visual. Facebook's new layout affected the optimal photo sizing you're used to creating. Here's a new cheat sheet.
  • As Facebook is public (and because they can) brands are having to pay more and more in order for their content to be seen by even a portion of their community. Many users and brands are not happy with their new algorithm.
    "Only 43% of marketers feel like their Facebook efforts are working." - Social Media Examiner
  • On the other hand, Facebook Audience Insights have grown dramatically, and marketers are really able to fine tune their ad targeting, especially through Facebook's Power Editor Tool. I've seen great success using the Power Editor to create Dark Posts.

 

Twitter:

  • Twitter rolled out some interesting changes that make your profile more similar to Facebook: new header image, pinning a tweet to the top of your feed, and adding more info to your profile page. So now I can pin my Spurs tweet to the top of my page and share my UT pride in my header image. #GoSpursGo #Hookem

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LinkedIn:

  • LinkedIn has recently rolled out Showcase Pages, removing the Product and Services tab on your Company Page. This allows people to follow certain initiatives, products or services of each company and these pages act as an extension of your Company Page. Though, it was a bummer to lose all of those product/service recommendations! I think the jury is still out on the success or effectiveness of Showcase Pages.
  • LinkedIn awards their Premium users a profile that looks very similar to Facebook's (do you see a trend here?) in order to help them stand out in searches and to allow them a more personal feel. As I'm not a Premium member, I'm very jealous of this new profile - but it will roll out to non-Premium members soon. I can't wait! See how awesome Deirdre Walsh's profile page looks?

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Google+:

  • Google+ has grown in importance in my eyes mainly because of the SEO value. In fact, I'm shifting time away from Facebook to Google+ because of Facebook's new algorithm.
  • +Post ads is a new program launched that allows brand pages with more than 1,000 followers to promote their Google+ content posts via Google's AdSense program. Learn more. I'm excited to try this program out!

 

Our awesome, new Senior Community Manager, Libby Taylor, elaborates on Online Communities:

More and more businesses and organizations are establishing online social collaboration communities for their customers, partners and employees. While these kinds of forums have been around for years, some new trends are emerging:

  • Moving to the cloud. With easier upgrades and the latest sets of features, the cloud has it all. Rather than hosting communities themselves, more companies are moving to cloud-based technologies.
  • Executive bloggers. Gone are the days when executives communicate only through a team of spokes-people creating press releases. Executive blogging is on the rise and customers and employees are connecting with them real-time.
  • Peer-to-peer support. Getting answers to questions is happening more than ever within online communities and can sometimes be faster and easier than getting support from the companies themselves.

 

I hope you find these social platform updates helpful. I could go on and on about updates and what the future holds, but I would love to hear what your favorites changes to social media are as well as how you're celebrating #SMDay!

Screen Shot 2014-06-13 at 4.58.48 PM.pngI'm no stranger to the soccer field. My dad, whose college nickname was Elep (Pele backwards), spent many weekends teaching me the sport and cheering me on at games. While it has been many years since I've played, I’m still able to take the lessons learned on the grass and apply them to my role as a social strategist.

 

In honor of The World Cup kickoff and Father's Day, I've created this list of the top nine social lessons learned from soccer.

 

1. Master the Fundamentals

Just like players need to understand how to dribble, pass, and shoot, community managers must develop a core set of skills.  These talents include content creation, project management, and relationship building. Once you master these competences, you can move on to advanced techniques like gamification, business analytics, and platform optimization.

 

2. Listen to Your Coach

A strategic, passionate coach is a key to winning. Community managers must also have an executive sponsor who is vested in the success of the team. This leader authorizes funding and resources, approves key policies, and champions the success of the program among the e-staff. Most importantly, the executive sponsor has the strength to empower cultural change.

 

3. Have a Game Plan

In sports, every game plan is unique. Similarly, each roadmap to online community success varies. That’s because businesses use communities to accomplish a wide range of goals, such as customer support, strategic alignment, partner relationships, etc. Despite the variety, community managers must have a well-documented plan with measurable objectives, strategic use cases and technical features prioritized on potential impact to the business and ability to execute.

 

4. Be 100% Committed

Good soccer players are dedicated 24/7.  They practice, watch what they eat, and live and breathe the game. The same applies to social professionals.  It’s an “always on” job. There are no customer service timeouts or Twitter rainouts. When conversations spike or news breaks, the community manager has to be available.

 

5. Play with Passion

As with anything in life, you are more successful if you’re passionate. Luckily with both soccer and social that zeal comes naturally.

 

6. Keep a Level Head

Just like soccer opponents try to slide tackle you, online communities are full of strikes on the brand. It’s crucial for community managers to help alleviate tense situations and not fuel them.

 

7. Find Strength in Your Team

Many of the world’s leading soccer scorers have contributed their success to the pinpoint passing skills of their teammates. Likewise, good community managers rely on strong communication and collaboration with individuals across the organization. Everyone from legal to marketing has a position to play.

 

8. Appreciate Your Fans

Every soccer team has a set of rabid fans, but so do strong online communities. That’s because these online networks are more than just modern communication vehicles. They are made up of people who have a shared passion and shared “why.” Renowned community managers put their fans first; empowering, amplifying and rewarding them.

 

9. Celebrate Your Gooooaaaalllls!

In both soccer and social, numbers matter. Nothing is more rewarding then winning!

 

From kids playing in the streets of St. Louis to professionals duking it out in Brazil, soccer touches so many lives.  In the same light, so does social. I’ve watched as the role of community manager has evolved from something delegated to the intern into a respected profession sought out by the world’s most powerful brands. No matter where you fall on the spectrum of either, know that you are part of something big.

 

If you like this post, feel free to download the related SlideShare presentation, "Top 9 Social Lessons Learned from Soccer."

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Usually when you meet someone for the first time, there are the customary pleasantries and common questions you exchange to get to know that person, like where they are from, and what college they went to, but my personal favorite is, “what do you do for a living?” When I tell somebody I do social media for a software company, there are typically a number of reactions that I encounter, including, but not limited to:

 

  • How do you do that for business exactly?
  • How did you get started in that?
  • Do you just play on Facebook all day?
  • What’s the ROI?
  • Blank stares (at which time, I elaborate).

 

I’ve come up with a number of answers over the years for all of these questions and reactions, some serious, some quirky, but I never get tired of discussing the topic. Most people’s initial reaction to my response is “wow, that’s super cool!” And I might be a bit biased, but I would have to say, I agree. I love what I do; it’s always changing and challenging and most importantly, interesting.

 

Now, I get to add an even cooler chapter to my story – working for Jive. As the new Social Media Marketing Manager, I can’t wait to dive into the discussion and get to know all of you. I’ll go first – I attended Santa Clara University, am originally from San Mateo, CA, and am a self proclaimed Disney geek who loves taking ballet classes. I’m sure you’ll see all of these aspects of what makes me “me” seep into my writing in the future.

 

I’m certain that this will be my next big adventure, and like all of you, I’m excited to continually improve my #workstyle.

tasmo.jpegWe just launched Jive's latest Open Source project, Tasmo. It's a key part of our cloud architecture, and as the technology matures we hope it becomes an important tool for other companies building large-scale systems on top of HBase. Yesterday, Jive engineers Pete Matern and Jonathan Colt presented the project at HBase Con and the source is available now on Github.

 

So, what exactly is Tasmo? A description from the documentation:

 

Tasmo a high performance and easy to use Open Source system for storing and retrieving data objects in HBase. It lets developers model application data using a simple system of Events and Materialized Views, freeing them from having to handle complex join and filter logic. It's highly optimized for read performance; a Materialized View is served with a single HBase row. Tasmo attempts to combine the scale, speed and fault-tolerance of a Big Data architecture with the developer productivity of a traditional database.

 

We're excited about the project, as well as what we're building on top of it for Jive customers!

 

Our larger commitment to open source continues (a long tradition at Jive). On our Developer Site, you can find open source SDKs and sample code for building apps on top of the Jive platform. We also have developers making significant contributions to projects we use in our architecture, such as jQuery Mobile, Kafka and SenseiDB.

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Guest post by Paul Vinelli

 

A lot of people are familiar with Reddit's "Ask Me Anything" forums, where some of the world's most fascinating people will take on any question from passionate fans.  While we at Jive might not be able to land Joan Jett or President Obama (yet), our community members have integrated the AMA concept into the Jive platform to showcase their amazing executives.  This type of outreach connects corporate leaders with their employees, and creates top notch content to showcase broad thinking throughout the entire company.

 

So, who made this possible?  Our community members, of course!  After David F. Carr InformationWeek asked for Tips on hosting an executive Town Hall online?, four of Jive's most active thought leaders (Tracy Maurer, Nikki Bussard, Jem Janik) chimed in to discuss best practices.  Not only that, but Jacqui Chan of Deutsche Bank took it a step further and composed A Guide to organise an AMA on Jive so that everyone can maximize their Jive experience.  Her "critical success factors" outlined:

 

  • Choice of executive to kick-start your AMA movement
  • Engagement rules
  • Orchestration
  • The "I GAVE" principle
  • Having a curated list of AMA guidelines handy for easy reference

 

Want to read more?  Check out Jacqui's post here.  And tell us more about how YOU integrate Jive into your company everyday so we can share YOUR story!

Disclaimer: I'm NOT a security expert; however, for the last month, I've been geeking out about the topic. Personally, the term "security" drums up the same level of excitement "social" did in 2006.


iStock_000024893774Small.jpgAs you may have seen in my post From Google to Gaga: The Top 9 Takeaways from SXSW 2014, the biggest breakthrough in tech this year wasn’t a new startup. It was the subject of privacy.  It started when Wikileaks founder Julian Assange Skped from an Ecuadorian embassy in London with more than 3,500 conference attendees.  At first, it seemed like a scene from a sci-fi movie with rhetoric from the latest conspiracy theorists. 

 

But then, Assange began sharing his point-of-view on the “military occupation of the Internet” and the ability for a few technology companies to capture massive amounts of information, creating a “surveillance nightmare.”  I left the session wanting to setup a Zuck vs. Assange debate and questioning the “share, share, share” mantra I’ve been preaching since I took my first social job in 2006. 

 

I continued to explore this topic. I went to sessions about Secret, a new app that allows users to “speak freely;” Darknet, a new kind of Internet where people can conceal their online behavior; and BitCoin, which enables anonymous payments using peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority or bank.

 

I started having flashbacks of my childhood, when I spent hours in Prodigy chatrooms creating fictional characters. I began to worry that as a technology community were going backwards.

 

Then, I came to realization that it’s about contextual privacy.  In our world of “connected things,” sensors are prolific.  They collect data about everything from location to heart rate. While I can’t help but geek out about the opportunity to use these new technologies, I must now UNDERSTAND what, when, where and why my information is being collected, analyzed, and shared.   As a good corporate marketer, I’m also on the mission to balance organizational needs with consumer desires.

 

Fatemeh Khatibloo, senior analyst at Forrester, put it this way, “context enables control, choice, and respect by putting guardrails around: data access and collection; data use; and data sharing.”

 

Additionally, she noted that contextual privacy addresses five questions:

  • Temporal: When can I collect info about and when can I use it?
  • Spatial: Where can I use data about you?
  • Functional: How can I collect and use data about you?
  • Identity: What persona are you when I interact with you?
  • Social: With whom can I share information about you?

 

Before I grant another app access to my Facebook page, I want to answer the questions above about the service.

 

Finally, in one of the highest attended sessions, Edward Snowden, who is famous for disclosing thousands of classified documents that revealed the operational details of global surveillance programs run by key governments, called on the technology community to build products that protect the right to privacy through the use of strong encryption technology.

 

I'm excited and proud to work for a social technology company that truly values user security and data.  Millions of users across the private and public sectors depend on Jive every day to keep their information safe and drive mission-critical business processes. That’s why we’ve taken a no-compromises approach to security, privacy and availability that combines best-of-breed technology, a highly trained and experienced staff, adherence to the strictest standards in the industry, and the flexibility to meet diverse requirements.

Many have you been asking When will the Jive Community upgrade to version 7?  Well, I'm happy to announce that day has come.   We

iStock_000003041480Small.jpgare now on the latest and greatest version of JiveX. 

 

Here are the 7 new features I'm most excited to share with you!

Social Sharing: Easily share your favorite Jive Community content on social media sites.

Enhanced Profiles: List your expertise and endorse your contacts.

Impact Metrics: See not only who has viewed your blog posts and documents, but who has referred them to others.

Search Weighting: Get more accurate results from a streamlined UX and new "smart search" algorithms.

Structured Outcomes: Mark content for action, or find final and official documentation.

Place Templates: Use pre-configured place templates designed for common use cases.

Enhanced iOS Native App: Create content, search for expertise, and interact via your custom streams. 

 

For a full list of all the enhancements, watch Video walk thru of new capabilities in JiveX.

 

 

P.S. This blog post was created by using the communications template from JiveX 7 Upgrade Planning Guide. Cheers to drinking our own champagne!

 

P.S.S. Visit Behind-the-Scenes: Upgrade the Jive Community to 7 for inside look on the process.

 

What's your favorite new feature in JiveX 7? Also, if you have The specified item was not found. or see issues report them in the The specified item was not found. space.  Thanks!

6a012876c6c7fb970c017d3cfc82f1970c.gifI know most of you reading that title are saying, "Duh;" however, it's an important reminder.

 

As someone who has managed corporate social media channels for the last NINE years (yes, I started with a corporate MySpace page), I often get wrapped up in the business goals and numbers surrounding social:

* How many fans and followers do we have?

* How many net new names are we getting from our efforts?

* How many clicks to the website did social deliver?

 

While all of those are important, I got an email today that made me sit back and reflect. First I thought, "Why am I getting an email? Everyone should message me in the community."  Then, I put my Gia Lyons-esque rant aside and got excited.  The simple note made me remember why I created my first social marketing program in 2006.  I wanted to have a true connection in real-time with my audience.

 

You see, I started off in Public Relations.  I graduated with a B.S. in P.R. No joke! Then, I spent years ghostwriting for state and local politicians, phone pitching the media on behalf of companies like HP, and leading crisis communications drills for large energy companies. While all of these things were exciting, I wanted a more direct relationship with the "public."  The emerging social channels gave me that.

 

The social media landscape, however, changed in the last few years.

  • There are only a few key social media sites, which are driven by data collection and ad dollars.
  • There is more noise, spam, and negativity posted than ever before.
  • There are a 8,224,925 people claiming to be social media experts on LinkedIn (myself included).

 

Why do I bring this up? Because I want Jive customers and employees to remember the best parts of being a company that "gets" social marketing.  We have to use social to build connections with customers, partners, employees, and prospects; share interesting information; and just be f'in cool. We also have to know that the social world is complex and sometimes nothing beats a face-to-face meetup.

 

So, I want to thank the folks internally at Jive and Rona Fouche at PWC for sharing the note below.  It made my day.

There was a power outage in the Phoenix Data Center and Rona Fouche from PwC said she first heard about it on Facebook by following Jive.

 

IMHO, social marketing is about truly about sharing the right information to the right people at the right time!

 

How have you seen social marketing evolve?  Share your story in the comments below.

Gamification 201, our second webcast in our three-part series, is now in the books. If you missed it, don’t fear… you can catch the on-demand version here

 

The webcast featured Community Managers from Hitachi Data Systems (Donna Garber and Nick Gable) and SolarWinds (Michael Torok) and was moderated by 7Summits (James Davidson). The community managers shared their unique stories on how Gamification was implemented in each of their communities and how it continues to play a critical role in the success of their external communities. 


As Gamification 201 comes to a close, don’t forget what James Davidson mentioned in his opening of the webcast:

 

"Gamification should be a key part of your implementation."

 

"It should not be an afterthought and needs to be planned, managed, measured and adjusted as your company matures."

 

According to Gartner:

More than 70% of the world’s largest 2,000 companies are expected to have deployed at least one gamified application by year-end 2014.


However, Gartner also predicts that:

By 2014, 80% of current gamified applications will fail to meet business objectives.

 

So, continue to learn on ways Gamification can help you meet your strategic community goals.


Jive_Gamification301_Promo.png

Finally, I want to thank our speakers and audience members who made Gamification 201 such an outstanding webcast.

 

The final chapter in our three part series is Gamification 301: 5 Ways Gamification Helps Advance a Social Business Strategy.  The webcast will take place on Wednesday, April 16th at 10:00 AM PST and feature guest speaker Kim Celestre, Senior Analyst at Forrester Research.

 

In the webcast, Kim will discuss how Gamification can help advance your social business strategy, more specifically:

  • What is Gamification and why it is essential in today's real-time environment
  • Five ways to advance your internal and external social strategy using Gamification
  • Examples of how brands use Gamification to drive and optimize desired action


Kim is an award-winning social media thought leader that specializes on social trends, challenges, and best practices that help marketers create social strategies and tactics that deliver value to their prospects and customers. Her research covers B2B and B2C marketing, with a specific emphasis on the use of social marketing platforms and online communities that shape exploration and buying behaviors. 


Don’t miss out on this chance to learn from this award winning thought leader!

We're saving you a seat. Register Now

iStock_000028641964Large.jpgOn March 10, I celebrated my 7th anniversary with my first social media darling, Twitter.  In fact, according to Twopcharts, that's 99.9 percent longer than all other Twitter users.


While we've had our ups and downs over the years, I still find Twitter to be a valuable social platform. Specifically (and measurably), for Jive, it's one of the most effective ways to share information about industry news, congratulate our customers, and connect in real-time during important events.


Luckily, I'm not the only one that sees value in this platform. Recently, CEOWorld Magazine named Jive CMO Elisa Steele one of the "Top Chief Marketing Officers You Should Follow on Twitter."


In light of this recognition, I did an informal interview with @elisasteele and gave her one rule: answer all my questions in 140 characters or less!


How long have you been on Twitter?

Started in 2009. Now it's part of my #workstyle.

 

What made you join?

Curiosity. Wanted to see the stories people were sharing. Had no intention of telling my own!

 

What made you get active?

Discovered @Twitter is a great platform to share what I love, learn from others and build relationships.

 

What are the subjects of your tweets?

#Moments #Work #Life #Whatever

 

You can continue this conversation with Elisa and me in the comments below or on Twitter at @elisasteele and @deirdrewalsh.

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