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Social Edge Consulting

5 Posts authored by: meghalicek

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1. Be Personable, Not Perfect

You already know this— Transparency IS social business. Fostering an open, enthusiastic environment is integral to the success of any social group. However, many community managers get stuck on presenting only the “perfect post", and over-analyzing every word. While it's great to strive for your content to be impressive, hyper-analyzing them down to a pulp really isn't what social business is about. To combat this, I always recommend clients make their community presence slightly vulnerable from time to time. It really helps to share a goofy personal story or inspiring tales of your own challenges and missteps. These methods will not only make you a more personable, well-rounded community manager, but will also reduce the "untouchable factor" of your dominant role. In due time, this will ease and entice your more hesitant community members to contribute their stories as well. Always set an honorable standard, but don't make the standard unattainable!

 

2. Don't Change Others; Change Their Work Methods

Community managers are often the most sociable and chatty in communities, but they know that not everyone will follow their lead. Don't expect everyone to be energetic and talkative throughout the community. At the end of the day, it's all about changing how work gets done. And the first part of facilitating that is to inspire --not pressure-- users to visualize the benefits and personal rewards. Coax community members slowly from their unique and multilayered comfort zones, and present them with real statistics that prove social business works. At the beginning of a potential client's Jive journey, my team organizes their use cases and connects them directly to potential return on investment and workflow improvement. You'll need to remind them of this and be patient along the way, and reward even the tiniest changes in adoption.


3. Scrutinize & Tailor Your Engagement Techniques

Do not lead your community with the flawed perspective that one size fits all. End users are not in a position to decode complicated puzzles and toil over nebulous information. Once a user is derailed by noisy training documents and engagement strategies, the likelihood of returning to the community is lower. Since full participation is essential, your engagement approaches deserve constant attention, devotion, and modification. Begin by analyzing your wide range of community members, then launching a subsequent array of diverse materials that have potential to sway even the most rigid of users. Regularly gauge what works by viewing page visits, bookmarks, and community manager reports. In client communities, I often offer a mixture of How-To videos, written Tutorials, and assorted Quick Tips that are straightforward and give the user several different outlets to learn. For members that need more personal interaction, I offer a collaborative "How Do I?"-style space, where they can ask questions and schedule one-on-one time if need be. Lastly, don't be afraid to make a change! It's better to give end users more options than none at all.


CC: Jive External Communities / Jive Internal Communities

With Jive Gamification, Engagement, and Rewards and user engagement strategies becoming more prevalent within corporate environments, it can be a challenge to navigate the options available. As we work with our clients in their Jive communities, we’ve become very familiar with Nitro, Jive’s @Bunchball Gamification Console. For those who have just started exploring Nitro, with a bit of practice you’ll be an expert before you know it!

First up: Some Bunchball basics. What is the Nitro Console exactly? It is a Jive-owned subset of Bunchball that gives businesses “the ability to sustainably engage users with highly personalized, collaborative, and rewarding game mechanics.” At Social Edge, we know that productivity can flourish when you integrate gamification tactics and missions with workflows. The options provided by the Nitro console create opportunities for users to complete work in a uniquely competitive environment, because we know that gratification is motivation (Source).

Now, let’s dive lightly into the console itself. Peppered across the left side of the console are five tabs: Site, Actions, Catalog, Users, and Analytics. Among the many tabs and options, here are three areas to help get you started:

  1. Site > Point Levels: Here you can adjust, add, delete, and modify point levels. Used properly in the community, the levels and their descriptions will incentivize end users to complete missions. These are their visual rewards for actively participating in the community—so you want to make each and every person feel victorious, even after completing the most simple of tasks. It is important to note that you can incorporate the theme and branding of your community within Nitro to personalize missions for your Jive environment.
  2. Actions > Missions: Within this tab, find a list of the out-of-the-box Nitro missions. To assist you with the timing and assignment of these missions, they are organized by range of difficulty. At Social Edge, we recommend editing the name and description of each mission to coincide with your community’s pre-existing naming conventions. You can also create specific rules for completion, and dates to accomplish them by. Remember: start small. Present simple missions first to intrigue and lure your end users– then steadily boost the difficulty as awareness rises and points soar. Our gamification philosophy at Social Edge is to keep your users on their toes, but remember to reward them frequently and consistently.
  3. Analytics > Dashboard: The importance of viewing your community’s metrics is indisputable! Take a peek at user statistics and set date perimeters for viewing all activity. By inspecting these statistics, you’ll be able to evaluate the missions you’ve been assigning to users, then assess and consider editing them. Ask yourself—Are the point levels too small? Is it too difficult to attain badges? Are users finding the missions challenging and overall rewarding? We recommend taking a step back and scrutinizing the steps in your plan where engagement is low.

Remember, strategy and methodology around your Bunchball use is vital. By 2014, Gartner Research Analysts predicts that a colossal 80% of gamification strategies will abruptly fail to deliver and meet business objectives (Source). Avid preparation and execution are essential here, and the Social Edge team can help you strategize and implement a gamification plan that leads to a successful and engaged community.

If you attended JiveWorld13, you were lucky to experience the excitement surrounding gamification. Bunchball hosted several sessions during the week informing attendees about how they can increase ROI through engaging users. A particularly exciting development is the creation of a new, more user-friendly Nitro Console that makes navigating and configuring missions easier than ever.

Be sure to stay tuned for a more in-depth look at the console and implementation tactics. As always, feel free to ask our experts here at Social Edge for any assistance or guidance. We would love to help you get your Bunchball implementation off the ground so you too can experience the productivity benefits the platform offers. At Social Edge, we can teach you ways to appropriately plan for, and achieve, your business goals using the system.

Ready, set… Game on!

Social Edge Consulting has a super exciting new product to share with you: The Mosaic widget. What is this exactly, you ask? It's a snazzy custom-developed Jive HTML widget that displays visual content and text in a responsive masonry layout. Treat your eyes to an enticing visual display on any of your Jive Community home pages. The clickable images automatically rearrange to stack perfectly, no matter how wide your users' screens are. It's engaging, easy-to-use, customizable and a beautiful way to visually highlight news and content from your community. Check it out!

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Our entire team will be available at The specified item was not found. at booth G3 to answer any questions you may have about the widget, including design specifications and pricing. We are so thrilled to share this product with you, and look forward to chatting!

 

If you won't be in attendance at JiveWorld13, stay tuned for more screenshots and demos in the Jive Community.


contact@socialedgeconsulting.com

The process of transferring an entire Information Technology department from a static intranet to Jive can seem daunting. Where does one even start? Luckily, I got the chance to experience this process first-hand while assisting with an insurance company’s transition to Jive.

 

We all know that a smooth-functioning IT sector is vital in successful businesses today. But to me, IT means a really complex puzzle of instructions, processes, codes, and all other sorts of things I don’t understand. While at this previous company, I worked within IT Communications—so I was among the tech-savvy—but knew embarrassingly little about it myself. My peers and I were tasked with using our Jive knowledge to organize and approach the job at hand.

 

With the move away from the old intranet, IT employees were very hesitant to transfer their piles of documentation and information over to a new, unfamiliar realm. Initially, they could not see the social value. “How can Information Technology succeed on Jive?” they asked. There was an evident struggle to understand how this could benefit them.

 

Our first step was setting up a simple “Global Information Technology” space, nicely organized with org charts and regional contact information. We threw in an “IT News” widget where we pushed information regarding software upgrades and network issues, all the while aggressively pushing our colleagues to follow and interact with the space. We had to train people that this was the only place to go to get these updates.

 

Next we looked to internal IT to help our presence flourish. By meeting and patiently working with units such as Enterprise Architecture, Information Security, Systems, IT Administration, and PMO, we slowly coaxed people to create groups, upload content, and invite members. Once these were created, we neatly linked to them from the Global IT landing space under a "Related Groups" widget. Although many of the groups were private, it still created an organized way for internal IT to convene and gain visibility.

 

As we know, Information Technology is incredibly important to the rest of the company in terms of offering technical and security assistance to employees. Before Jive, employees drudged through paperwork and made several phone calls when they experienced a computer, network, or phone issue. The wait times were usually long, sometimes for issues that could be easily fixed with simple instructions. The company “Help Desk” phone line was outsourced to a company in India, so each phone call was costing the company money. This was a costly process that needed fixing.

 

To attempt to solve this, we created an “IT Help Desk” group (advertising and linking to it from the original space), presenting a simple layout of user-friendly document categories. Viewers could click FAQ’s for categories like Hardware, Software, Wireless Access, Equipment Procurement & Procedures, and Microsoft Tools. We also added a simple “Need Help?” widget, listing escalation policies and the names of knowledgeable techies to contact. We also provided the option for employees to type in questions they may have in an “Ask IT” widget. IT staff took turns monitoring these questions and answering them in a timely manner. We also asked the Communications and Marketing teams at the company to advertise for us with their occasional news updates, saying that this wastheplace to go for tech help.

 

After instituting these changes, the department was able to perform in a more efficient and organized manner. End-users could find the answers to their questions easily, without having to dig through stale information and be endlessly transferred from person to person on the phone. As popularity for the “IT Help Desk” group grew, users even started contributing by answering questions and getting in on the action. A great sense of connectedness was finally reached in a once complicated and alienated department.

The process of transferring an entire Information Technology department from a static intranet to Jive can seem daunting. Where does one even start? Luckily, I got the chance to experience this process first-hand while assisting with an insurance company’s transition to Jive.

 

We all know that a smooth-functioning IT sector is vital in successful businesses today. But to me, IT means a really complex puzzle of instructions, processes, codes, and all other sorts of things I don’t understand. While at this previous company, I worked within IT Communications—so I was among the tech-savvy—but knew embarrassingly little about it myself. My peers and I were tasked with using our Jive knowledge to organize and approach the job at hand.

 

With the move away from the old intranet, IT employees were very hesitant to transfer their piles of documentation and information over to a new, unfamiliar realm. Initially, they could not see the social value. “How can Information Technology succeed on Jive?” they asked. There was an evident struggle to understand how this could benefit them.

 

Our first step was setting up a simple “Global Information Technology” space, nicely organized with org charts and regional contact information. We threw in an “IT News” widget where we pushed information regarding software upgrades and network issues, all the while aggressively pushing our colleagues to follow and interact with the space. We had to train people that this was the only place to go to get these updates.

 

Next we looked to internal IT to help our presence flourish. By meeting and patiently working with units such as Enterprise Architecture, Information Security, Systems, IT Administration, and PMO, we slowly coaxed people to create groups, upload content, and invite members. Once these were created, we neatly linked to them from the Global IT landing space under a "Related Groups" widget. Although many of the groups were private, it still created an organized way for internal IT to convene and gain visibility.

 

As we know, Information Technology is incredibly important to the rest of the company in terms of offering technical and security assistance to employees. Before Jive, employees drudged through paperwork and made several phone calls when they experienced a computer, network, or phone issue. The wait times were usually long, sometimes for issues that could be easily fixed with simple instructions. The company “Help Desk” phone line was outsourced to a company in India, so each phone call was costing the company money. This was a costly process that needed fixing.

 

To attempt to solve this, we created an “IT Help Desk” group (advertising and linking to it from the original space), presenting a simple layout of user-friendly document categories. Viewers could click FAQ’s for categories like Hardware, Software, Wireless Access, Equipment Procurement & Procedures, and Microsoft Tools. We also added a simple “Need Help?” widget, listing escalation policies and the names of knowledgeable techies to contact. We also provided the option for employees to type in questions they may have in an “Ask IT” widget. IT staff took turns monitoring these questions and answering them in a timely manner. We also asked the Communications and Marketing teams at the company to advertise for us with their occasional news updates, saying that this wasthe place to go for tech help.

 

After instituting these changes, the department was able to perform in a more efficient and organized manner. End-users could find the answers to their questions easily, without having to dig through stale information and be endlessly transferred from person to person on the phone. As popularity for the “IT Help Desk” group grew, users even started contributing by answering questions and getting in on the action. A great sense of connectedness was finally reached in a once complicated and alienated department.