The Jive Adoption Deck of Cards

Version 13

    Playing Your Cards Right: Don't Get Caught Bluffing When You're Betting on Adoption  << Read this First!!

     

    The following "Cards" are participation and adoption campaigns that you can use to help boost levels of activity in Jive. This is meant to be a collection of ideas from all of us, so feel free to add your own! We can have multiple of the same card, so feel free to duplicate!

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    Ace - The Weekly Digest

    By default, Jive sets the Weekly Digest email to be sent out once a week (Thursdays). You may notice that Thursdays are your most active days within Jive - and rightfully so. The digest is a great way of reminding users to login to Jive and participate. This technique works best when you've had that default setting going for a while. A majority of your users will be used to logging in on Thursdays, so when you switch to a Twice a week digest, that group will continue to login on Thursdays, while new users will become accustomed to Tuesdays and Fridays. We implemented this technique after a year and adoption took off. We now have 3 peak days instead of one. You may notice a drop in those Thursdays, but that's okay. The gain in the other two days will more than make up for it. Already sending messages twice a week? Customize the template's color scheme to make it stand out more in a user's inbox.

     

    King - The Photo Calendar Contest

    Depending on where you're geographically located, decide on a season that is most visually appealing. Here in New England, we chose Fall. This contest is a great way to add a graphic element to your community. People are naturally drawn to images, so this visually stimulating contest is always a hit. Setup the contest to allow users to upload or reply with an image of the season taken by that user/employee. We ran this contest for a month, allowing users to Like their favorite photos. We took the top 12 and created a calendar for the next year using the top 14 images (Cover, 12 Months, Back). Each of the winners received a copy of the calendar and extras were used as prizes and or marketing collateral until the end of the year.

     

    Queen - Travel Scrabble: Discussions

    This is a great to teach users the basics of discussions or generate more interest in your space/group. Travel Scrabble starts with a single word chosen by you. Each user responds to the discussion with a new word. They can only change one letter in the previous word, and they can't rotate, add or remove letters. You should also instruct them to @ mention a peer in their reply to encourage greater participation. The simplicity of this method will bring users in. For example: Box > Fox > Foe > Doe.

     

    Jack - Travel Scrabble: Documents

    This is a great to teach users the basics of documents or generate more interest in your space/group. Travel Scrabble starts with a single word chosen by you. Each user edits the document with a new word. They can only change one letter in the previous word, and they can't rotate, add or remove letters. You should also instruct them to @ mention a peer in their revision to encourage greater participation. The method is more complex than discussions, but will introduce a very powerful feature. For example: Box > Fox > Foe > Doe.

     

    10 - Builder's Challenge

    The logistics of this campaign are a bit more involved, so its best used as a rollout campaign or as a booster rather than a reactionary implementation. Start by purchasing Lego or K-NEX pieces in bulk. Distribute 4-5 pieces to each target user. (We added as part of a desk drop of rollout materials) Instruct users to create teams with the people around them or in their office. The teams should combine their pieces to create something awesome. Users should then upload a picture of their creation and post it to a discussion as a reply, while @ mentioning their entire team. Collectively, all users vote on the coolest creation and you can distribute some sort of surprise. The exercise is meant to demonstrate how social networking can enable employees to share and build upon each other's knowledge.

     

    9 - The Blog-a-thon

    A blog-a-thon is designed to help users learn how to post to community blogs or from their own as well as how to comment on blog posts by encouraging comments and posts in return for points and/or prizes. Users will write a blog post with a specific naming convention about a topic you chose and then comment on at least one other blog post within the community. Start a blog announcing the blog-a-thon and suggest users blog about specific topic. Apple vs Google vs Microsoft always seems to work.

     

    8 - The Share-a-thon

    Starting a Share-a-thon is a great way to increase participation in your community and with your content. While there are no formal rules to a Share-a-thon, you can use these principles to form your own. The purpose of a Share-a-thon is to draw attention to content and help promote a culture of contribution and participation. Start by crafting a message that is of particular interest to your audience, like an announcement from an executive or a newsletter. Preface the content with instructions to share that content with at least 3 others via the Share button or @ mention. Ensure to let them know that the message will only be distributed in this manner, so if you want colleagues to get the message, they have to share it! Also in your message, provide an incentive. We state that if the content reaches X amount of views, replies, bookmarks, or likes by a specific date, we'll increase points achieved for posting a status update for a week.

     

    7 - Discussion Days

    This is a simple way to increase usage in discussions, as well as point people towards content you want them to view. Post a system blog explaining the campaign. We called ours "The Discussion Days of Summer" at a time when users stopped posting new discussions. Explain, with whatever twist you like, that points for creating new discussions will double for a specific period (2 weeks works well). Also, take the opportunity to link to any documentation you have on how to start a discussion as well as any content that "They may have missed" that you want them to read. Promote the blog with status updates and highlight discussions as they're created. This will give the impression that "everyone is doing it mannnn".

     

    6 - The Most Interesting Person in the World

    If you haven't seen the recent Dos Equis commercials featuring the Mosting Interesting Man in the World, head to YouTube and watch a few. This campaign is focused on promoting Work-Life balance and employee interaction. Create a discussion called The Most Interesting Person at [Insert your company here]. Set the stage that for the next month, employees will be encouraged to share what makes them so interesting via their hobbies and interests. Employees should respond by using the format: I don't always work at CompanyXYZ, and when I don't, I prefer to... Adding an example with images will help to make the post more eye-catching. This campaign works extremely well because people love to talk about all the awesome things they do. I own land in Scotland, people now refer to me as Lord Hall; another employee was in Back to the Future Part III, and our winner has built his own submarine and raised two WWII fighter planes from the bottom of the Ocean. The winner gets bragging rights for the year!

     

    5 - Titles that Make a Difference

    Jive does a great job of labeling its widgets so that Community Owners know exactly what they do. When adding widgets to an overview page, Owners also have the benefit of reading the description of the widget however, regular users don't have access to these widget descriptions and can get lost or confused about what they're seeing. More importantly, many users don't know what they're being asked to do. Changing the titles of your widgets isn't a campaign or game that you can play, but it is an effective way to re-engage and capture your audience. As I mentioned before, Jive does a pretty good job of labeling these widgets, but they're intentionally a bit vague, which provides us with an opportunity. The title of each widget is an opportunity to create a call-to-action or to engage your audience by helping them understand what they're seeing. A simple change like switching "Recently Joined" to "New Colleagues" (Internal example, but you get the idea) will make the widget more friendly. Change the Ask a Question widget to say "Engage the support community with a question" or "Ask Executive XYZ a question on his/her latest Town Hall". Communities with more descriptive widget titles have seen higher engagement levels that those with standard descriptions.

     

    4 - Help Docs to Help Seed Content

    If you have a new Jive instance or a new wave of users that are unfamiliar with Jive, you can easily engage them with Help or Support related content. Creating or redoing your help documents is a simple way to re-invigorate your activity streams and catch people's attention. Its also an opportunity to repurpose content. We've used a two pronged approach to our help content. We start by posting the formal steps to complete a process with Jive of use a feature. That help document provides a basic description, but little in the way of a use case. We follow the post with a blog that "introduces" or showcases the feature. This provides you with an arena to describe use cases that are relevant to what's happening at your company now. As the company evolves - you can post new blogs about features/use cases. Users who just want the steps get them, and anyone interested with the "Why" is pulled into the post. Breaking the features up will create more activity over an extended period of time, which will ensure that there is a continual stream of fresh content. Uploading all of your support content at once may be great, but you lose an opportunity to keep users engaged. Adding the blog posts creates a more authoritative experience, and helps you avoid the perception that you're just slow at upload support content. You can always upload support content about the basics, and introduce additional features over a period of time.

     

    3 - The Photo Scavenger Hunt

    One of our community owners ran this contest with great success. The incentive for contributing was the chance to win one of twenty $5 giftcards. The contest featured a discussion each week with 3 clues. Users were instructed to snap pictures of their submission and respond to the discussion. What made the contest so interesting was that the clues were intentionally left open ended. Users were challenged to come up with their own items that fit the clues, so technically there was no right or wrong answer. For example one clue was: "What is restricted, but endless. Runs, but never gets tired. Curves, bends and soothes?" The winning entry was a picture of a backyard waterfall from the employee's home. Winners are determined by the number of likes they receive. Additional prizes were given to users who could get their peers to post in the community and @mention the user and include the tag #scavenger. The community saw activity increase directly in the posts, but also in content creation because of the additional incentive to pull in peers.

     

    2 - Random Acts of Candy

    If you have budget constraints, but want a major impact on engagement, try Random Acts of Candy. For just a few dollars, our start-up spaces and groups have been able to quickly attract members and participation by enticing employees with bite-size treats. There are several applications for this method, but the one we've been using most commonly is for enticing users to join new communities. At launch, we post announcements and status updates about the new community, its purpose, and where to find it. That message include a call-to-action for members to join, with the hook being that new members/followers will be selected at random to receive a "sweet reward". By purchasing a few large bags of candy ($30-40 bucks max, depending on how many people you're trying to reach), we were able to increase membership in a new community three times faster than groups without any incentive. Each Monday, select 3 people at random from your list of members/followers and send them 2 to 3 pieces of candy, then follow with a status update that @mentions them, the community, and has a # for RandomActsofCandy. Works like a charm!

     

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    Ace - ELA "Everyone Loves Acronyms"

    If your organization is anything like ours, you most likely have about a zillion acronyms that are used frequently in meetings and conversations. New employees and department transfers alike often spend weeks, if not months, catching up on terminology and acronyms. I can still hear the network engineer that sat next to me at my first desk having what I can only assume was a perfectly logical conversation made up almost entirely of acronyms - "Okay setup the EGG to the BDP and then bring in RCB, T3D. R2-D2 and then C3P0"...you get the idea. This campaign will ease the pressure on employees by providing definitions of acronyms and the context of where they're used. On a secondary level, its also a great way to teach users how to collaborate using Jive Documents. Start by identifying the perfect place to post your document. We chose our "Water Cooler" place because it already had an extensive user base and was completely open to the whole company. Create a document with five columns (Acronym, Definition, Applicable Departments/SBUs, Also Known As and Notes) and post the document. Create a table for each letter and use Anchor links to make it easy for users to jump down the page. The individual tables also make it easier for users to sort. for clarity and learning, we added steps at the top for adding a new row, sorting a column and updating an existing entry. In a few days we had a few hundred entries, after a month we now have THOUSANDS of entries and this document remains in the top 10 most viewed items each week.

     

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    Jack - Advocates share their favorite features in Jive

    We have a strong advocates group who meet every two weeks to discuss what is happening in our Community and share a favorite feature in Jive. Although our group is restricted the sharing of enthusiasm and proven use of the community helsp our advocates spread the word to their colleagues. We also record the webinars for future viewing.

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    3 - Profile Portrait Session

    The most common reason that employees give for not adding a headshot photo to their Jive profile is that they don't have one they like. If your team has a photographer on staff, pick one day to set up a photo session in the office. Invite employees to come by and get a professional headshot/portrait taken. Do a little post-production retouching (if you have the time and resources), and send each employee their "official" company headshot to use for their profile and avatar.

     

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