Looking at more new messages on a thread I opened back in February, it's plain to see that a growing number of us are being affected by spam.  I'm sure we can all agree that the costs associated with managing it and mitigating any associated risks are starting to add up quickly.

 

The truth is, any time you allow users to post something on your website, there's always a risk that it will used for a purpose it wasn't intended for. In short, spam will happen and your primary goal should be on managing it rather than trying to stop it completely (not that stopping it wouldn't be nice!).  Going on lock down mode isn't always scalable, nor is chasing your tail in trying to delete all spam posts: we need to establish a balance between maintaining enough freedom for the community to continue thriving while having enough monitoring tools in place to identify and remove new threats immediately.

 

Community admins, moderators and the community need better tools to handle spam and I've seen some really good suggestions in the Jive community.  Here are some I've seen around the community and a few more I added:

  • Ability to report user the same way content can be reported
    • Same rules can apply (i.e. # reports hide's user and all their content)
  • Setup different rules for different types of abuse reports: I'd like to specify that items/people reported as spam get hidden after 1 report but items reported as general abuses get hidden after 2 reports.  (Right now, we can only specify globally for all types of abuse reports)
  • Repair and expand the message governor: How can a new user be allowed to post 50 content items within an hour of registering?  We really need the ability to limit how much a user can post, of any content type, within a specified time frame.  The current model only applies to a single content type and simply specifies the amount of time between posts: this needs more thought to come up with a better, more effective model.
  • Ability to activate moderation site wide during an attack rather than the cumbersome space by space approach
  • More rigorous testing to ensure there aren't any ways to bypass moderation
  • Private Jive space where confirmed community managers can share developments on the latest spam attacks away from prying eyes: trends/campaigns, issues identified, etc.


This list can keep growing and I welcome your suggestions.


In case no one has said so, you're all doing a great job handling the spam onslaught: Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm...