11 Replies Latest reply: Feb 14, 2011 10:46 AM by Tracy Maurer RSS

    How do you decide who gets a space vs. using a group?

    Jem Janik

      We launched with only groups, but for political reasons I need to be prepared to potentially consider opening up spaces.  I'm interested in how others decide this.

        • Re: How do you decide who gets a space vs. using a group?
          Kevin Crossman

          Gia Lyons' series is a great place to start:

          http://www.giatalks.com/2009/09/jive-sbs-structure-best-practices-part-1/

           

          Our stakeholder committee works with us to "vet" new top-level space requests. We want to keep the number of top-level spaces fairly limited and broad. I'll also reach out to you offline for further discussion.

            • Re: How do you decide who gets a space vs. using a group?
              Jon Hoehne

              We essentially use these components.

               

              - Reference material in Gia's link as background

              - Our knowledge of how are employees are trying to work today

              - Our strategic goals with respect to the collaboration activity we want to encourage or develop

               

              With that in mind, we've moved towards a process where spaces are supporting more strategic companywide objectives and have a broad scope. These spaces are "vetted" to help align them with the strategic objectives. This process has changed over time as we've learned. One of the advantages is that it reinforces the notion that they will be supported, and mitigates some of the risks like empty spaces. In other words, as a company objective we wanted to do this anyway, Jive or no Jive.

               

              Groups have evolved as smaller scale collaborations with relatively limited scope. For example, people all using the same software tool helping each other out. The key element here for us is that the members of the groups inherently have the same level of permission. We also have a many cross functional efforts that lend themselves to this format. These groups of people can manage themselves and don't need any of the administrative overhead associated with a Space.

               

              Some specific examples to reinforce this:

               

              Our biggest space is sponsored by two of our senior VPs with the goal of encouraging company wide collaboration and support on anything we work on. It is essentially a catch all for anything work related anyone wants to discuss/get help with.

               

              On the other hand, I started several groups as virtual versions of the cross function groups I run anyway. The scope of those groups is the existing charter.

            • Re: How do you decide who gets a space vs. using a group?
              jimjonesWRS

              Jem, for us the decision was (or "will be," since the internal community goes live late Q2) easy.  We're starting with spaces and will ease our way into groups, as opposed to the other way around.  Our spaces will be arranged either by our products/techologies, or by functional group within the company (HR, finance, legal, etc).

               

              This is a legacy thing for us - we're moving off a Wiki-based internal web site.  Since the structure was already set up and people are familiar with it, we're going to keep it for now.

               

              You mentioned politics - I had a similar problem with groups.  There's a fear among some of our executives that this will become "facebook for the enterprise" and a big time-waster.  "Groups" are perceived as social gatherings or virtual water coolers around which people can waste time talking about non-work stuff - so we're staying away from groups for now.

                • Re: How do you decide who gets a space vs. using a group?
                  Jem Janik

                  Interesting.  If you want a stat - we have very few non-work topic groups – I know of about 20 out a little over 2100 groups.

                  • Re: How do you decide who gets a space vs. using a group?
                    Tracy Maurer

                    FWIW, our experience has been that yes, at first groups with non-work topics were pretty popular. We didn't discourage them, but rather used them as a way to get people to feel comfortable with the platform. And once it was no longer a novelty, the activity in the non-work groups has pretty well died off. There are a few that remain sustainable, but mostly due to one or two people who try hard to maintain or cultivate the activity. Or sometimes there will be an uptake in activity when some new people join the company - again, until the novelty wears off. And so it really does work to help people get comfortable, and honestly both with the platform and sometimes also with the company culture.

                  • Re: How do you decide who gets a space vs. using a group?
                    Tracy Maurer

                    Jem, we started with both groups and spaces. Spaces are our more structured areas, allowing for a bit more hierarchical navigation. Because Jive is the first cross-company platform, we were very used to hierarchical navigation and so this had a certain comfort level for managers and people wanting to cluster the bulk of the information around their own corporate brand/culture to make it easy for their employees to find things. And then groups were used mostly for either non-work interactions or when small groups needed a controlled-access area for a project or for planning.

                     

                    As the platform invites more collaboration across company lines, we've seen groups used more widely to facilitate this movement. But we also have a separate space hierarchy that is set up to specifically denote cross-company information.

                     

                    The beauty of groups is that if you allow the community to create them, you by default have an admin to take ownership, watch over and cultivate the area. Group structure also by design limits expansion - you can't make sub-groups. Space admins can (and often do) create sub-spaces to their heart's content, unless you limit them. Pros and cons to each of the community types.

                      • Re: How do you decide who gets a space vs. using a group?
                        Jem Janik

                        Do you mind sharing a an example of an area that is cross-company you have a space for?

                          • Re: How do you decide who gets a space vs. using a group?
                            Tracy Maurer

                            Here are a couple of good ones:

                            • All UBM News and More - a place where people can post questions that they are looking for answers to. For example, experience working with a particular vendor or product,
                            • Help Wanted - we've got all of our various HR departments doing their internal job postings here. Then people from all of the companies can see what is available globally. It has allowed us to keep talent internal to the UBM family, and open up growth opportunities that were otherwise hidden.
                            • Corporate Identity Centre - Guidelines for logos, marketing materials, as well as resource files are all stored here. It has helped to make the trasnformation of the company names, logos, etc more transparent and accessible to all of the companies and their employees, as well as making it easier for the group supplying the guidance and resources to share them.