3 Replies Latest reply on Aug 8, 2011 10:53 AM by disaacs

    Developing Process Improvement Program as a Group??

      As the Enterprise Community Manager for a new platform just going live....I am looking for practical ways to get the business engaged and using our Jive platform. I have proposed that our IT organization start a group to collect process improvements and cost saving ideas (related to IT).  Of course, we will be using the Ideation feature and I will most likely set up categories.  But I am trying to figure out a simple process that will be understood by everyone on how the whole process will work. For example:

       

      1. Submit idea in our group and assign it to one of the categories.

      2. Allow conversation to build around the idea and for voting to take place.

      3. Monitor activity around the ideas and identify which ideas are valid (can we rely on number of votes and comments?)

      4. Present the top ideas to IT executive team to select ideas for implementation.

      5. Acknowledge idea and the author.

       

      I don't want to make this process too rigid and full of governance steps.  But this is IT and they will expect some level of governance.  Who changes the ideas status?

       

      Any ideas out there?  Anyone else doing this? I also think it would be a good idea to open the group up to the entire enterprise and not just IT personnel.....any thoughts?  Looking forward to hearing your input!

        • Re: Developing Process Improvement Program as a Group??

          Damon,

          We are also in the midst of going live across an entire organization. Based on our experience, I would hesitate to use Ideation early in your rollout. While it may differ in every organization, I think ideation is more useful as your population gets comfortable with the other aspects of the platform. I suggest going ahead with the group and then organized discussions around each process improvement. It seems newer users are more comfortable with posting in a discussion than the a  new automated process like ideation. You could always use polls too to take the group's pulse on a topic quickly. Once everyone is comfortable with discussions, polls and group dynamics, I would then step it up into a structured ideation.

          You also don't want a "build it and they will come" approach, as not everyone may find a need to use the ideation at first, and then you may have a low engaged vehicle on your hands for all to see.

          Again, every organization has a different comfort level with social computing, so this is just my advice.

          Good luck!

          1 person found this helpful
            • Re: Developing Process Improvement Program as a Group??

              Good points...but it is too late.  The ideation module was turned on during the pilot and as our population has grown it is already being used by several groups.  Our company already had a collaborative culture with the use of SharePoint. They are use to sharing and discussing ideas.

               

              This group I am speaking of is for IT Process Improvements.  IT employees (300) from all of our global sites will submit process improvement and cost savings ideas within this group.  The will submit these suggestions as ideas.  The ideas can then be voted on and discussed openly within the group. This discussion will give IT management the data necessary to make decisions on which improvements to adopt.

            • Re: Developing Process Improvement Program as a Group??
              tmaurer

              I would tend to agree with Patrick. We have been live for three years now, and we're just getting ready to go live with ideation. If you give people too many bells and whistles, they can easily get overwhelmed.

               

              That said, I'd love to hear what other simple process steps people have put in place or used in their instances when they launch Ideation. My concern is that if we allow people to implement, but then they don't follow through, this could be an engagement killer. But obviously too much process will kill it just as fast (cause no one will want to implement).