3 Replies Latest reply on May 15, 2007 6:58 AM by britchie

    Version or revision tracking of wiki attached documents

      For uploaded documents we get version/revision tracking of the attached document, but can only attach a single document to a limited text description.

       

      For wiki documuents we get no version/revision tracking of attached documents, but can attach multiple documents to an extensive text/table/image wiki page description.

       

      I''m finding our users are using wiki attached documents because they can use the wiki page for context, descriptions, editorials, excerpts, and links - but they give up version control and tracking of the attachments.

       

      Those users who opt for uploaded documents are frustrated by the limited text description field.

       

      What if instead of having an "uploaded document" option, there was only and wiki document option and the wiki document managed version and revision tracking of it''s attachments??

        • Re: Version or revision tracking of wiki attached documents

          hi Crick,

           

          For wiki documents each version of the document contains just those attachments that were uploaded / associated with that version.  So for example, if you create a wiki document called ''clearspace'' and upload the MS Word documents ''specifications.doc'' and ''installation.doc'' to it and publish it, that''ll be version 1.  Edit the document and upload a new version of ''installation.doc'' and publish the wiki document and you''ll have version 2.  If the second upload of installation.doc was incorrect, you can roll back to version 1 and you''ll get the old ''installation.doc'' (as well as the old wiki document).  Are you suggesting that we split out the revision tracking of attachments from the wiki document? 

           

          Cheers,

           

          AJ

            • Re: Version or revision tracking of wiki attached documents

              When I upload a new version of a doc to a non-wiki, the old version does not show.  Only a single version of the doc is shown. 

               

              When I upload a new version of a doc to a wiki, the old and the new versions show with the same file name (two listings.  upload another, three listings show).  So I can make four changes to the wiki attachment and the wiki doc will show four attachments - all with the same name.  Rolling back drops the newer listings of the attachment.

               

              I''m suggesting that if I upload a newer version of a doc to a wiki, the older version not be displayed.  If I want to get to the older version, I can go to the older version of the wiki using the manage versions link.

               

              So, I''m not suggesting splitting revision tracking of the wiki doc and its attachments.  I think that if users upload an updated attachment, the action should count as a revision and the new revision should not list the old versions of the attachment, only the most recently attached.

               

              -crick

               

              All of this begs the question:  Why do we need two types of documents at all?  What is the benefit of a non-wiki document?

                • Re: Version or revision tracking of wiki attached documents

                  crick,

                   

                  I''ll let AJ handle the main portion of your reply however I wanted to touch on your last point.

                   

                  The ''binary'' document type is very useful for importing from existing solutions or file systems. Using the document import functionality currently available in the admin tool and a write functionality of a future release of the webdav plugin you can import a whole filesystem into Clearspace without requiring a word -> text conversion process (which we currently do not have) or the creation of wrapper documents that just have the binary document as an attachment.

                   

                  In addition we find the binary document type very useful for internal documents such as resumes and the like for which there is it very unlikely that the document is ever going to editted - just viewed and used for reference.

                   

                   

                  Regards,

                   

                  Bruce Ritchie