5 Replies Latest reply on Apr 18, 2016 5:41 PM by mia.crampton@icann.org

    Adoption question- bringing people into Jive environment

    mia.crampton@icann.org

      I am using Jive-n for my employee intranet, and have recently launched just a few months ago (cloud instance).  I have a very technically inclined employee base (many security paranoids, etc).  Our instance requires you to log into Okta (single sign on) and then click on a button in the Okta landing page to get to our internal instance. So from an employee experience, there are several 'barriers' to just getting into Jive.

       

      1) log into okta

      2) click on the okta tile to get to Jive (which is one of about twenty other tiles in the okta landing page)

       

      I'm the head of Internal Comms at the organization and have felt that I need to 'drip feed' when people post important blogs or updates, and have curated weekly emails to send to the organization to highlight some content and bring them into Jive.  (I give a few tidbits via the email itself and then say 'read more in Jive' and links to the right content).   However, I find that my unique views for this content is still rather low.

       

      I believe some of my security paranoids are ignoring these emails as cyber security best practice has educated our staff that this is a potential phish email and not to click not the links- even though I send them from a 'trusted' email account. (It doesn't help that our cyber security team has done many drills and confused people by sending out fake emails from execs or HR with spoof phish links and we all failed this test because the emails are just too realistic!)

       

      Even when I do an Announcement to whole community the unique views are low; I believe because people don't trust those emails yet from Jive, so I started doing an email via outlook with the link to content in Jive instead which seemed to resonate a bit better with my audience.

       

      My questions/thoughts:

      • At what point should I consider stopping this 'drip feed' approach i.e sending emails about key content being posted? I know i must meet people half way while they get used to logging into Jive more regularly, but also don't want to create MORE email and feel if I take a harder stance on this, then it could help 'force' people in because they will simply miss key info otherwise.
        • on top of this, my cyber security team is advising that I CAN"T send links out (looks like phish email) and should say something like 'search for XXXX in Jive' instead of providing a link.
      • Is there something I am not taking advantage of- like Jive Digests, instead  of manually curating these weekly updates?
      • FYI- In a few weeks I will be moving our community overview page to the News page and setting up more custom news feeds for users (news by department, location and global stuff everyone gets)

       

      I'm sure others have similar challenges of bringing people into Jive environment when it is simply one of many tools available to employees, and email is the realistic way to reach everyone and would love to hear your thoughts!

        • Re: Adoption question- bringing people into Jive environment
          Emilie

          Curating helpful content from your community in order to drive engagement is a good tactic to employ, mia.crampton@icann.org. However, I think your concern that you're simply creating more email might be a valid one.

           

          I wonder a little bit more about the content you are sharing, since despite the effort you put into these email digests, you're still seeing minimal click throughs to the actual content on Jive. What content goes into these digests? Have you asked people what kind of content they would want in these digests? Are you including top rated content? Content that has lots of activity? Or is it mostly company announcements? If it's just the latter, then you're missing out on the awesomesauce of community-curated content. Let the community show you what content people care about and then use a channel like email to help bring more attention to it.

           

          Those are just some quick thoughts but you've certainly asked a question that many internal community managers struggle with. You are not alone.

            • Re: Adoption question- bringing people into Jive environment
              mia.crampton@icann.org

              Thanks! I am choosing a mix of content eg company announcement type ones plus others that seem popular. But I'm trying to cater to a global audience so choose things that are more globally relevant.

               

              For example- our Singapore staff have a ton of popular content and are early adopters of Jive, but most of their content wouldn't be interesting to my global staff. I do sometimes include their content just to show that there's popular stuff with community action.

               

              Let me ask- what reports or analytics would you look at to deem "popular" content to put in the curated newsletters? I typically have been using high # of unique views or comments/ likes. But since I do these weekly, I often find content hasn't had much time to 'marinate' and get popular...since it's never older than 5-6 days before a weekly curated roundup comes out.

               

              I have also been putting very operational items in these eg performance management deadlines etc. I had positive feedback on this from a few colleagues because it was the first time someone connected all of the 'due dates' across the org and put into one simple view, but it certainly isn't the peer to peer popular content.

               

              But again- the 'business critical' content would go directly into the email body, and the 'popular content' people would need to click to read more in Jive. Should I pull back more and 'make' people come to Jive for the business critical content? How do I know when this is the right move / my people are ready (bearing in mind we still haven't launched mobile apps due to some internal security configuration delays). I don't feel I can make people go thru hurdles to get to biz critical info just yet, but maybe when the apps are available to my staff this isn't a big barrier anymore (my workforce is highly mobile!)

               

              I welcome other thoughts on finding this balance between how much spoon-feeding to do vs tapping into the FOMO (fear of missing out) and that if it has value, people will come.

               

              FYI the content I don't put into a manually curated digest barely gets any views and it's all from the same people every time (about 10% of staff).  It is because they follow a lot of people and therefore are alerted when they post content so they truly don't need an extra digest. I guess we want to spread this behavior to more staff to reduce the need to spoon feed info??

               

              Sent from my iPhone

                • Re: Adoption question- bringing people into Jive environment
                  Emilie

                  OK, this is all good to know, so a few more suggestions:

                   

                  Let me ask- what reports or analytics would you look at to deem "popular" content to put in the curated newsletters? I typically have been using high # of unique views or comments/ likes. But since I do these weekly, I often find content hasn't had much time to 'marinate' and get popular...since it's never older than 5-6 days before a weekly curated roundup comes out.

                  Yes, I'd start with those health metrics to surface up content that matters. However, you are absolutely right: one week isn't often long enough for a good conversation to marinate. If it were me, I would consider testing a monthly digest rather than a weekly digest, for two reasons: 1) It will provide more time for the good stuff to bubble up to the top. 2) It will also alleviate some of the burden of putting together a newsletter on a weekly basis, especially if you haven't quite cracked the code of getting people to navigate to pages on the community.

                   

                  From a content marketing perspective, it's quite possible that you are finding and promoting the right content but there are so many other factors (email send time, subject line, email design) that might be weighing into the click through performance. I suppose this might be a reason to stick with weekly digests, if only for the opportunity to test more of these variables. I guess just keep those other variables in mind.

                  I have also been putting very operational items in these eg performance management deadlines etc. I had positive feedback on this from a few colleagues because it was the first time someone connected all of the 'due dates' across the org and put into one simple view, but it certainly isn't the peer to peer popular content.

                  Another thing you may want to focus on is training your "advocates" and "influencers" on how to partner with you on these digests. Put some of the onus and responsibility on them. These business owners would want employees to be aware of these deadlines, so make sure they are doing their fair share of the work to gather these and communicate them out, whether by Jive or by email.

                  But again- the 'business critical' content would go directly into the email body, and the 'popular content' people would need to click to read more in Jive. Should I pull back more and 'make' people come to Jive for the business critical content?

                  Be careful here. It's important to decide which objective is more valuable to the business here. Is it more important that you meet people where they are most comfortable in order to consume critical company info (i.e. email)? Or is it more important to increase activity on your internal Jive instance? While you and I both know Jive should be the long term answer, there is often a long and arduous transition. Email isn't going away anytime soon and if you can safely say EVERYONE reads their email but only some people read updates on Jive, then you'll have to acknowledge each platform's role in internal comms.

                   

                  As I mentioned, an email digest is a tried-and-true method to help increase activity. But if it's not garnering the results you'd expect (or need), then you might consider some other tactics that prove more worthwhile.  If you're not sure what things to try, go back to when you defined use cases and make a business case for Jive in the first place. Build small wins and successes around those use cases. Try education and training programs with key influencers (like execs or group managers) or the masses of employees. Point being: if there's not an easy, obvious answer to "what's in it for me?" for employees when you explain "why Jive," then it's going to a tough road to adoption, no matter how much spoon feeding and FOMO you employ.

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