3 Replies Latest reply on May 5, 2016 8:01 AM by socketz

    Correct Answers - Is this an important metric?

    Toby Metcalf

      Good day everyone,

      I am struggling with this metric as a measure of community health.

      Marking an answer correct lets everyone following a discussion know a solution has been found and that solution bubbles up to the top.

      More important than the answer rate is the access to the knowledge, but I an having trouble getting the original posters to consistently take the next step of marking an answer correct.

      Currently we make polite calls to action to posters when we see multiple answers provided - I would rather not use an automated email alert to members to take action.

      I can drive this number up by having my engineers and Community Champions mark answers correct, but that is just gaming a number; I want to drive behavior.

       

      The questions are:

      Is this a KPI you use?

      How do you get users to take the action?

       

      Thanks for your suggestions.

      Best,

      Toby

       

       

       

       

        • Re: Correct Answers - Is this an important metric?
          socketz

          Having an engineer marking the discussion correct is not necessarily gaming the number.  Typically, in most scenarios, once the initial question[s] are answered to a satisfactory level, the user ceases contribution to the thread. This fact, combined with a resident expert reviewing this thread and marking it correct is typically how answers get marked correct as most users simply move on once they have an answer.

           

          One thing you will note is that if you mark it correct, and the user feels that the answer is not complete, they will be the first one to tell you. What I have also found is that users do not like marking things correct because they like to treat the original support thread they created as an ongoing dialog for any other problems they encounter. This is why when supporting complex products, you will see users try to append new, completely unrelated questions to existing ones. Some essentially do not see the questions/discussion as complete until they have completed their design and its in production.

           

          At least these have been my findings, nearly 2.5 years and almost 5K questions worth of experience. Of course there are always corner cases and situations where someone needs to apply some form of human judgement, so this is where the seasoned community manager adds value.  For us, I monitor email threads/discussions between distributors, internal Marketing/Sales and AEs as well, so when support traffic also funnels into the forum[s], I have several means to evaluate the service being exerted by the team.

          2 people found this helpful
            • Re: Correct Answers - Is this an important metric?
              Toby Metcalf

              I appreciate the answer Michael - thank you.

              I also find a reason for not marking answers correct is there may be more that 1 correct way to do something.

              This shows the importance of not just establishing a metric, but understanding how it is achieved.

              Best,

              Toby

                • Re: Correct Answers - Is this an important metric?
                  socketz

                  Very well said Toby. I try to explain this to my management team as well.  They look at 'new questions' in my analytics report each month and often get excited when they see the number from the last month either level off or decrease.  To them, this means that customers are servicing themselves using existing content or working through partners for support. However, what it often means is that the depth of the discussions that month are much more technical and involve alot more internal resources and testing to resolve.  But within Jive, it's still just counted as a single question.

                   

                  As more of the world leverages collaborative platforms like Jive to scale support, I think we will all continue to learn and understand some of these metric caveats and establish effective means to work around them.  This is why I continue to see the Community Manager role evolving, even though most people still see the "Community Manager" as someone that works in a retirement home arranging breakfast for patrons.  It will take time :-)