8 Replies Latest reply on May 17, 2017 3:37 PM by Sarah O'Meara

    How to find a good summer intern, starting with the right title

    kateweaver

      Does anyone have a successful strategy for a job title and general description of an extranet intern?  I don't think the title "Extranet Intern" will make sense to many college students, so am looking for something different but relevant.  My experience so far has been frustrating, because I don't think the right people are seeing the ad, so advice is greatly appreciated.  It seemed like casting a wider net with a general job title got me more applicants that didn't fit the job description, but the descriptive job title got too few applicants.

       

      We are looking for an intern for the summer (starting in less than a month) who can assist the Extranet Director (me) in the daily tasks of managing our Community.

       

      Job Summary

      This internship will assist the Director of the Extranet, coordinating the enhancements and additions to our new extranet (client-facing web site).  This role would be for a candidate interested in web design, user experience, user interaction models, and social media development.  This role will be operating as somewhat of a quasi “Digital Librarian.”  The intern would also learn the social community product, Jive-X, which has become the predominant user community product.

       

      Duties & Responsibilities

      • User interface design and development work
      • Content creation and management
      • Basic web work
      • Development work to function on API’s between Jive-X and products such as “Box” and “Sharepoint”
      • User account creation and provisioning
      • User activity analysis and evaluation
      • All other duties as assigned

       

        I did some research on Glassdoor and tried a couple different titles and here were our results, with 95% same job description (above):

      • Information Technology Intern (example found on Glassdoor with this title):  60+ applicants, none with any social media or marketing skills, mostly developers and programmers
      • Customer Community Designer Intern (internal brainstormed title): 7 applicants, 1 well qualified with social media and content development experience, but didn't work out, 2 somewhat qualified but found positions better suited for their skills

       

      Thanks for any ideas.

      -Kate

        • Re: How to find a good summer intern, starting with the right title
          Sarah O'Meara

          I don't have THE answer, but I personally suggest casting a wider net because this is how Libby Taylor and I found each other and I absolutely LOVE my job as community manager. I don't think many students consider community management when looking for an internship, so being terribly specific isn't going to encourage them to read the description (even though it is the coolest job ever, in my opinion).

           

          When I was first applying for jobs before Jive, I was looking in a completely different field when my agent said she had found a job that aligned with my skills and previous experience. To give you a glimpse of me as the person who was looking at a huge amount of job ads, I was looking at the requirements and what skills they were looking for rather than the title. For Jive, the skills listed were broad enough that I could relate to them rather than being so specific that I gave up (need someone to write interesting content? I wrote blogs! Want someone who can manage projects? I was an administrative assistant and helped with campaigns! Need someone to be involved in the community? I was a teacher who had to keep people interested and be able to gauge what is important to them!).

           

          Here is my personal recommendation:

          • Hook them with an interesting title, but don't scare them off with a very specific title that they may have never heard of or understand. They will keep on scrolling.
          • Think more broadly about what skills they need and cater to their interests (social media, managing projects, interacting with customers, etc.) They may not have the EXACT skills you are looking for, but if you can link it to skills they do have and they are willing to learn, you may have yourself a great intern!

           

          More specifically concerning titles, I think mentioning "manager" is a great term to keep in. It sounds important and pretty cool for a college student to be a "manager." It's not misleading either (if they read the job description) because they will be managing content, design and development, activity analysis and account creation. I would give you specific job title ideas, but I haven't backed them up with research . Here are some key words I think would peak their interest: "creative" "design" "online" "manager" "community" etc.

           

          I hope you find a great intern!

          1 person found this helpful
            • Re: How to find a good summer intern, starting with the right title
              socketz

              I still recall the vision that flashed through my mind 4 years ago (below - google image) when I was a former Online Marketing guy turned Field Applications Engineer transitioning into the throws of implementing our online community.  At the time, our Jive Platform Consultant referred to me as a "Community Manager"

              Image result for community manager golf cart

               

              If you setup a LinkedIn job filter to send you all Community Manager roles, your will quickly see what I mean...

               

              However, I have since learned to embrace this reference with a deep understanding of just how versatile one needs to be in order to be effective at this job.

               

              Now, the following image comes to mind.

              Hence this is why I always recommend to new companies looking to implement online communities to first look within and find people that are passionate about the companies products and services, and know how to manage cross functional teams and sell the value of scale and branding that a world class community offers.

               

              I think the burden of proof will fall on all of us over the course of the next 5 years or so to challenge the current "web guy" perspective.

              1 person found this helpful
              • Re: How to find a good summer intern, starting with the right title
                kateweaver

                Wow, Sarah O'Meara - your background sounds like a great fit for a Community Manager.  Thank you for your great insight from the job-seeker's perspective.  It's a lot easier to identify the desired technical skills and project management than the content writing and community involvement, so I really appreciate your thoughtful response.  I am definitely going to use your key word suggestions.  Thank you.

              • Re: How to find a good summer intern, starting with the right title
                socketz

                Hey kateweaver

                 

                Personally, I would drop any reference to Extranet/Connectivity and supplement it with a term which is synonymous with why your extranet exists.

                 

                Based on my experience, most companies leverage extranet type connectivity to provide some form of support to their partner networks. You will also need to clarify where you want their domain expertise to resonate, be it IT Type Skills, Social Marketing, Inbound/Outbound marketing, community management, branding/design, etc.

                 

                I'm guessing you want someone that is comfortable leveraging technology, but seeks a career which leverages technology to solve business issues (i.e. a fairly seasoned Community Manager type).

                 

                if so, then maybe something like this would work....

                 

                Online Partner Solutions

                Channel Enablement

                Digital Partner Marketing

                 

                Etc.

                 

                If I am on the right track above, then I would reword the following as they are going to attract fairly seasoned User Interface and IT Developer types:

                 

                • User interface design and development work
                • Basic web work
                • Development work to function on API’s between Jive-X and products such as “Box” and “Sharepoint”

                 

                Maybe:

                 

                • Leverage existing tools within current third party community platform to develop and maintain intuitive user interfaces
                • Content creation and management to support our evolving partner network
                • Day to day administration of third party community platform
                • Work with the development team to define business requirements which leverage connectivity between the third party community platform and other internal platforms such as “Box” and “Sharepoint”

                 

                Hope this helps.

                 

                Mike

                1 person found this helpful
                  • Re: How to find a good summer intern, starting with the right title
                    kateweaver

                    Michael Fortner, thank you so much for your thoughtful response.  Your suggestions for rewording are spot-on.  You also bring up a great point about clearly stating where we want their domain expertise to resonate.  I'd define the domain expertise to be a hybrid between social marketing and community management - we want them to focus on managing who/what is on our extranet, as well as give both a boost (new and improved content and more clients doing more activities).

                     

                    You've provided some great ideas and wording as well as some food for thought.

                     

                    Thanks - you've been a great help.

                     

                    -Kate

                    1 person found this helpful
                  • Re: How to find a good summer intern, starting with the right title
                    kateweaver

                    Your advice was great - Michael Fortner and Sarah O'Meara

                    With many of your recommendations, I reposted the position as a Social Media Intern and received applications from about 25 great candidates, narrowed it down to the top 5 for screening, interviewed the top 3, and am in the process of hiring one with a well-fitting background and experience.  She won't start for a few weeks, but she interviewed really well and her resume is well-suited to the job.

                     

                    Thanks again!

                    -Kate

                    1 person found this helpful